Inspirational Messages For LIfe

Hypeless Messages To Show Life Is Not Hopeless

Short Inspiring Stories: Lewis Hamilton’s Drive

 

In December 1995, Ron Dennis, the team principal of the McLaren Formula 1 team, attended the Autosport Awards ceremony. Whilst there, Dennis was approached by a small ten year old boy of mixed race for an autograph. The boy looked at Dennis and announced “Hi. I’m Lewis Hamilton. I won the British Championship and one day I want to be racing your cars.” Dennis smiled and wrote these words of motivation in the autograph book, “Phone me in nine years, we’ll sort something out then.”

Lewis Hamilton was born on 7 January 1985 in Stevenage, Hertfordshire. His father, Anthony, was himself born of Grenadian parents who came to England in the 1950s. His mother, Carmen Larbalestier was white British. Lewis (named after sprinter Carl Lewis) was brought up by his mother for ten years after his parents split in 1987 and then by his father and stepmother.

Lewis showed promise in motor sport very early on. His father bought him a radio-controlled car in 1991 and he came second in the BRDA national championship the following year against adult competitors. This success brought Lewis to the notice of the BBC and he was featured on the Blue Peter programme.

Motor racing is an extremely expensive sport but Anthony Hamilton told his son that he would support him as long as Lewis worked hard at school. To keep this promise, Anthony had to take redundancy as an IT manager and become a contractor, often working three jobs at a time to support his son. Eventually this determination led to Anthony setting up his own IT company and becoming manager for and giving words of motivation to Lewis and is now doing the same for the new boy in the Formula 1 world, Paul di Resta.

Lewis did work hard at school but even better at sports. He played cricket for his school and football too. Lewis feels if his racing career had not taken off he might have become a professional footballer. Interestingly he was bullied at school and took up Karate to help overcome this.

At the age of eight, Lewis began karting and began to achieve success in that field. In 1998, after he had won his second British karting championship, the telephone rang and it was Ron Dennis delivering on his promise early. Lewis was signed to the McLaren driver development programme, which included the option of a Formula 1 drive in the future.

In 2001, Michael Schumacher raced Hamilton in karts and was full of praise for his driving style. Shortly after this, Lewis started racing cars in Formula Renault.

After rising up through the formulae, Lewis Hamilton finally got his drive in a Formula 1 car in 2007 and celebrated with a third place in his first race. He went on to be the youngest driver to lead the world championship. In 2008 he went on to become the youngest world champion.

Lewis is very much determined to win, despite controversy along the way. In Spain in 2008 he was racially abused by spectators and recently his sometimes aggressive driving style has lead him to incur penalties from race stewards. He reflected after on race that he had “a platinum membership card” to the stewards’ office. One other driver has also been criticized for aggression in the recent past and that was seven times world champion Michael Schumacher.

Interestingly, Nicolas Hamilton, Lewis’ half-brother has cerebral palsy but has just started a racing career himself in the Renault Clio Cup. He is often to be seen with his father cheering Lewis on at Formula 1 races and was recently filmed at the 2011 Hungarian Grand Prix glaring as Lewis served a drive-through penalty.

Lewis Hamilton has both entertained and thrilled Formula 1 fans with his determination and his humanity. Presently teamed up with Former champion Jensen Button at McLaren, the two of them have always shown a sense of humour off the racetrack but a will to win on track.

To watch Lewis Hamilton drive is to think how lucky he is to have the career he has but, as is so often the case, this ignores the perseverance and sacrifices made by both father and son to get him to this point.

Lewis Hamilton has a lot of inspiration messages to give us.

Click here to watch a fascinating 2007 BBC documentary on the career of Lewis Hamilton.

 

  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo Buzz
  • StumbleUpon

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , ,

Inspiration Messages: Heroes Fight Back

Those who are a success in life will have the ability to fight back. To persist. To find the word of motivation to rise from the ashes and rise again.

Many of the millionaires in the world have had financial problems in the past and indeed many have been bankrupt.

Disaster is nature’s way of determining those who are worthy of achieving their dreams. If things are going really bad for you see it not as the end but a test.

The worst things get, the closer you are to success.

Those should be words of inspiration and strength for you. Ordinary people would turn back, extraordinary people fight through.

This is true wherever in the world you are. Watch the video from India below and then welcome the challenges.

Pray for setbacks.

 

 

  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo Buzz
  • StumbleUpon

Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

Short Inspiring Stories: Ernestine Shepherd

Now I can’t say I am a great fan of bodybuilding (take a look at my physique and you will know) but a short inspiring story caught my eye the other day.

Having written about the fear of old age recently the story was particularly apt.

Ernestine Shepherd is a dedicated female body builder. She wakes up at three every morning to go for a 10 mile run before starting a strict weights routine. She is a certified personal trainer and a part-time model too.

So what? You may ask. Mrs Shepherd is 74 years old and only started training at the age of 56. At that time she was overweight and had no previous interest in fitness at all. Her sister and she decided to get fit but then the sister sadly died. Ernestine decided to continue the fitness regime as she knew that was what her sister would have wanted.

She runs marathons and has had no aches or pains since she started working out. She has a permanently positive attitude and supports Michelle Obama in campaigning to overcome the obesity problem in the USA.

Inspired by this short inspiring story? Then visit Ernestine’s website here.

Watch a video about Ernestine here.

 

  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo Buzz
  • StumbleUpon

Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

Words Of Motivation: Fearing Ill Health, Old Age And Death

The more significant fears we have during our lives concern major changes over which we feel we have no control and no words of motivation can counter this: or so many of us think. We therefore fear falling ill or growing old or even death.

In many ways these are all related to each other but we will deal with them separately.

Fear Of Ill Health

Napoleon Hill in his great book, ‘Think And Grow Rich,’ states that he believed more than three quarters of those visiting doctors suffer from hypochondria or imaginary illness.

The fear of falling ill can actually replicate the symptoms of that illness and indeed in extreme cases can actually create the illness. The mind is stronger than many people realize and can work for positive or negative. As Hill wrote, “Powerful and mighty is the human mind! It builds or it destroys.”

“There is overwhelming evidence that disease sometimes begins in the form of negative thought impulse. Such an impulse may be passed from one mind to another by suggestion, or created by an individual in his own mind.”

Sadly this fear has been encouraged by suppliers of drugs and medicines in an attempt to boost sales of their products.  Advertisements often suggest you might have a certain condition and a particular brand of medicine will help you.

In the same way that words of motivation can help you improve your life, words can also be used to make you feel things are not going well.

Those who suffer from a fear of illness will try all the fad diets and remedies around and, not surprisingly, are unlikely to find any work. They will talk about and concentrate on an illness until it appears and then they will react with ‘I told you so.’ Indeed there is some evidence to suggest worry about illness can affect the immune system.

Victims will look for attention and sympathy and will suffer from a lack of ambition and will be lazy. Ironically they will avoid having an active and healthy outdoor life.

As with so many fears, sufferers may well turn to alcohol and narcotics to disguise their symptoms.

The Fear Of Old Age

Of course a fear of illnesses related to old age is part of this fear but so also is a worry about a perceived loss of abilities and functions (including sexual).  Equally there is a fear of a loss of independence and freedom and of poverty.

The fear of poverty in old age relates not only to an inadequate pension provision but also in terms of medical bills and care costs. There is also the worry that others might move in and take advantage of the situation.

The media also promotes this fear. Television programmes and films always portray older people as inadequate and useless when this does not have to be the case at all.  I was delighted to see the movie ‘Harry Brown’ showing a retired man fighting back, for example.

Even the traditional image of wisdom and intelligence in old age is being eroded, replaced instead by the view that people of a certain age are doddery and incapable. Not surprisingly this enables companies promoting mobility aids, pensions, drugs and medicines to sell more products.

No wonder more and more people fear their old age.

This results in many suffering a premature slowdown with a feeling that the age of 40 is the beginning of the end. Words of motivation tell us that with a growing older population this certainly is not true at all. Yet too many start apologizing for being ‘old’ and feel inferior.

After a certain age too many people feel unable to show imagination and self-reliance.

Others go too far the other way and start to masquerade as a younger person with dyed hair, inappropriate dress and riding powerful motorcycles. In reality this simply inspires ridicule.

The Fear Of Death

This fear comes from an ignorance of what happens after we die. In previous years this was dealt with by words of motivation from various religions generally putting a positive slant on the process (reincarnation or ascending into heaven). However some leaders did use the situation to their advantage by taking the opposite viewpoint, threatening terrible consequences if people did not follow their instructions.

Somewhere in our subconscious is a fear of fire and brimstone.

Regrettably the ignorance about death has also been used by extremist leaders to offer eternal glory to suicide bombers for example.

I suspect the fear of death has something to do with guilt at not having lead a fulfilling life. Certainly the fear can lead people to worry instead of making the most of their lives. This can be the result of not having a purpose or some meaningful activity.

Once again a fear of poverty is true but this time for the loved ones who are left.


 

Conclusion

Sadly all these fears are based on erroneous information and the stereotypes offered by the media. Such images should not be accepted and should be replaced by words of motivation that give you an understanding that you are as well or unwell as you want to be.

Recently I watched my 99-year-old neighbour climb a ladder to clean his windows. Clearly nobody has told him he is not able to do so.

 

  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo Buzz
  • StumbleUpon

Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

Words Of Motivation: Free Youth, Free Running

Many adults fear the ‘younger generation’ will let us down.

I can give you words of motivation that say no they won’t.

Why? Watch this video below.

In France, in the United Kingdom and increasingly around the world, young people are giving themselves words of motivation and are getting involved in what at first seems a crazy sport…

Parkour or Free Running.

Teenagers and young adults are pushing themselves to become awesomely fit so they can undertake the most astonishing street gymnastics in safety.

No matter how many rules and regulations there are, those who excel at Parkour do so entirely with their own words of motivation. The sport blossoms because it is free of rules and restrictions.

This is what youth can do without interference.

Believe in them and the world will be safe.

 

 

  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo Buzz
  • StumbleUpon

Technorati Tags: , , , , ,

Word Of Motivation: Restrictive Labeling

 

My garden is quite small but mature. I have decided to make it a wildlife garden (that is another way to say I do no gardening) and now birds fill it during the day and at night it is owned by hedgehogs.

One of the birds is a majestic sparrow hawk. He is the scourge of the smaller birds as every now and again he plunges into the garden and grabs and kills another bird. That is what he is meant to do. That is his role in life. He is a sparrow hawk and kills birds; he will never become a vegetarian.

Here are some words of motivation for you: humans are not sparrow hawks. We can choose our way in life. Yes we can.

And yet most people accept labels. I wish I had money for every time someone has said to me, ‘I can’t do that because I am…’ It is almost pandemic. Perhaps it is a product of a world that needs to label people to produce statistics or perhaps it is a result of the accessibility of mass media, but whatever the cause, we are placed into prisons of labeling.

No matter what words of motivation we hear there is always some propaganda that tells us why we are unable to fulfill our potential.

In Britain one of the most restrictive labels I hear increasingly is based on class. ‘I am working class’ or ‘I am middle class’ as if that somehow defines who we are. If somebody can tell me where to go to find out which class I belong to I would be grateful. I don’t see myself as in one class or another. I am me.

Many countries of the world now, including Britain, operate a meritocracy. In other words, if you are prepared to make the effort you are able to reach any level in society you desire. Really. Now these are not simply words of motivation, this is reality.

Other people label themselves in ways that seem like a comfort zone to them. There are many examples; perhaps they feel they can’t get a job because they didn’t go to college or they can’t drive on a motorway because they do not know how or it frightens them.  They can’t do this because they are a man or a woman; they are too tall, too short, too fat, too thin, too young, too old, too ugly, too beautiful.
 

Why should these things hold them back from achieving their dreams?

There are always methods to change the situation and frequently what seemed a barrier before just evaporates in the face of determined action.

Oh, sure there are always going to be people who will agree with you and say your label is a valid reason to restrict your prospects. And then there is Lacey Henderson, Or Nick Vujicic. Or David.

Lacey Henderson is a young college student in Denver, Colorado who lost her leg at the age of nine and yet is more active and enjoys life more than most others of her age. She describes herself as not disabled but “differently abled.”

Then there is Nick Vujicic. Nick is an Australian public speaker, spreading words of motivation to millions of people during his entertaining talks. So what? Nick has no arms and no legs and yet he loves and enjoys life to the full. See a video on Nick and his words of motivation here.

David (not his real name) was a young Scout when I was involved in the movement as an instructor. He joined in all the activities, including long hikes at night and through muddy and rocky terrain. He would get upset if he didn’t get involved in everything that went on. Yet David was a paraplegic and confined to a wheelchair. To go hiking we would tie ropes to the front and back of his wheelchair and drag him through everything.

Today David is a successful computer programmer.

Contrast Peter with David. Peter lived the other side of the road to David and he had a clubfoot. Peter could not get involved in any physical activities as he was ‘disabled.’

A while ago I was told someone could not have a long-lasting relationship because she ‘builds walls around her emotions.’ Now I am never going to be so crass as to be anything but sympathetic and it is not always easy to break free of our labels even using words of motivation others (like me) might dispense but I was so tempted to say ‘well, don’t – it is entirely up to you.’

It is. It is entirely our choice. We build the fences around us. We accept the labels people give us.

I have a bad back. Big deal. A few years ago a medical professional suggested I should be registered disabled and I considered the idea. But something inside me said ‘cobblers, I am not disabled and I will not be unless I decide to be.’ So I kept away from the idea and today I feel as fit as anybody.

So it is your decision. What label do you want? I know a few labels I do want; I want labels like ‘successful,’ ‘loves life’ and ‘pushes boundaries.’ Now those are some words of motivation I like.

What about you?

 

  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo Buzz
  • StumbleUpon

Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

Inspiration Messages: The Lessons From Cheating In Tennis

A few weeks ago I was able to watch a tennis match during a national championship at a local club. It was a lovely sunny day so it should have been relaxing and there should have been no inspiration messages for me to write about.

The match I was watching was between a young girl, I will call her Lucy, the daughter of a friend, and an adult player. Lucy is in her early teens but an extremely talented player (she is always highly ranked for her age despite a series of injuries). She was playing a Russian professional or semi-professional in her twenties who has played in the early rounds of Wimbledon.

On paper the match should have been a foregone conclusion. However the Russian gave the impression that she lacked talent and soon started to get rattled by the sheer talent of her opponent. And this is where things started to change.

The older player started to cheat. She would call shots out when they were in and would question or alter the score. It soon became clear she was bullying her opponent, as she was much younger.

It got to the stage where Lucy’s father asked the senior umpire to watch the game (umpires tend to walk around and not watch one match unless asked). The Russian started to bully the umpire.

Although there was now an umpire present, the damage was done. Lucy lost her nerve and the match.

As the game progressed and I realized what was happening I started to think: ‘why would somebody cheat like that?’

At first I thought the older woman was so keen on winning she would do anything to do so. And then another thought entered my mind. The Russian was panicking. Her body language was very negative and I could see it in her eyes. It was not just that she was not winning, she was consumed by a fear of failure.

Perhaps she felt she was slipping back, her time had passed. Here she was facing a girl half her age who was undeniably more talented. She had run out of ability and was facing defeat, which was something she could not handle.

In life and especially in sport, defeat is something you need to experience. Often losing teaches you a great deal more that winning. Of course you never want to lose but on the other hand you need to be able to lose and learn from it.

What do you gain by winning through cheating?

Certainly in tennis cheating will only get you so far. Once you get to the levels where each match has an umpire and you meet the talented players, like Lucy, your lack of talent becomes obvious.

I’m told cheating is common at the junior levels of tennis. The inspiration messages to be learned then are learning to be equal to it.

If Lucy had kept her nerve, she could have won the match. How could she have helped herself? The truth is her Russian opponent’s cheating had been telling Lucy that she had run out of talent and was frightened. This should be one of the signs Lucy needed to stay calm, grit her teeth, up her game and go in for the kill.

As the athlete Roger Black said, “I could lose all my money. I could lose my house. But I can’t fail, because there is no such thing as failure. If you’re an athlete or whatever you do, the worst thing is to be afraid of failure.”

 

  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo Buzz
  • StumbleUpon

Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

Inspiration Messages And The Fear Of Criticism

It was recently reported that a columnist writing for the Daily Telegraph had closed his online blog following excessive criticism in comments to that blog.

With the availability of mass media such as the Internet, individuals can make their opinions and criticisms available to a wide audience. This is further exacerbated by the fact that the use of nom de plumes ensures the critic frequently remains anonymous.

Writing in 1937, Napoleon Hill observed, “Criticism is the one form of service of which everyone has too much. Everyone has a stock of it which is handed out, gratis, whether called for or not.”

I believe the free availability of opinions has made the fear of criticism a major problem in modern society. Individuals are less likely to go their own way for fear of the criticism that will almost inevitably follow.

In his classic book, ‘Think And Grow Rich,’ Napoleon Hill discusses the fear of criticism. “The fear of criticism robs man of his initiative, destroys his power of imagination, limits his individuality, takes away his self-reliance, and does him damage in a hundred other ways.”

My knowledge of lobster or crab fishing is woefully inadequate but I have heard an analogy made with the way these crustacea are caught. The baskets used work primarily because any lobster or crab trying to escape is pulled back in by his fellow captives.  Regrettably human beings are much the same.

If one person tries to be successful others will try to pull him or her back through various forms of criticism.

The Symptoms

Included in this fear are the fears of public speaking and stage fright.

This fear has definite effects and symptoms the most obvious of which must be nervousness and timidity. Sufferers are self-conscious and hesitant in meeting and holding conversations with strangers. Their body language is nervous and restrained.

Perhaps not surprisingly the fear of criticism also shows as an inability to make firm decisions or express definite opinions. It creates laziness, procrastination, giving too much weight to the opinions of others and no firmness of purpose.

The most interesting features of the fear however arise from a raging inferiority complex. This involves overcompensating in ways such as using long words (often without knowing the meaning), appearing as if superior to others, overspending and boasting of imaginary achievements. Even imitating and copying the dress of others is a sure indicator.

Conclusion

Now you can see how many people struggle with this fear.

The answer is to understand that you are capable of achieving anything you really determine to pursue. Understand that your critics are saying more about their own insecurities than about you.

Listen to all the words of motivation that tell you you can do it because, quite frankly, you can.



 

  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo Buzz
  • StumbleUpon

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,