Inspirational Messages For LIfe

Hypeless Messages To Show Life Is Not Hopeless

Molly Burke Provides Inspiration Messages

 
 

Schoolgirl in Grey Pullover Looking To One Side

 

School bullies have been responsible for breaking quite a few of their victims but some who have been bullied have turned their tormentors words into words of motivation.

Molly Burke of Ontario, Canada was four years old when she was diagnosed with retinitis pigments, which lead to a total loss of vision in a matter of years. Eventually she had to use a white stick and then was assigned a guide dog. In the meantime the bullying began and one child even suggested Molly kill herself. She did consider ending her own life, suffered depression and started to cut herself.

One day she fell and broke her ankle. She had to use crutches to get around and so was unable to take the dog with her. Other school girls lead her to a nearby forest, took away and smashed her crutches and ran away laughing.

Molly changed schools but the bullying continued. Eventually she found the courage to talk to the principal, who alerted her family. It was then that the young schoolgirl discovered there were people in her life who loved her enough to support her and provide words of motivation for her.

This inspirational young woman is now 18 years old and is one of Canada’s most popular public speakers. She talks on behalf of the Me to We company, which provides ethical products, experiences and speakers. Molly spreads words of motivation around schools across Canada, particularly to combat the bullying too many children experience.

Many of us could learn so much from such an inspirational young woman. As she says on the Me to We website: “If I can get up every single day motivated and able to inspire just one person, then everything I’ve been through is worth it.”

Find out more about Molly on the CTVNews website.
 
 

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Short Inspiring Stories: The Struggle of Orlando Bloom

 
 

Orlando Bloom In Black Tie And White Shirt

 
How many of us have a dream, only to give up when things get a little tough? One person who had such a dream, faced many obstacles on the way and yet still found inspiration messages enough to press on and achieve that dream was the actor Orlando Bloom.

Born on 13 January 1977, in Canterbury, Kent, Bloom was named after the 16th century composer Orlando Gibbons. He had one elder sister, Samantha, and was the son of Sonia and Harry Bloom. His mother had been born in India and Harry was a South African born Jewish anti-apartheid novelist.

When Orlando was four, his father died of a stroke and nine years later it was revealed to him that his real biological father was a family friend, Colin Stone, who became Orlando’s guardian.

Orlando Bloom is dyslexic but, with words of motivation from his family, he managed to get through school in Canterbury. A key turning point for the young man was when he realised that the characters he had watched in films or on television were simply actors playing a part. Suddenly he wanted to play his heroes and his dream to be an actor began. Initially he was active in school plays and the local theatre company and became interested in poetry and prose.

Pursuing his ambitions, the young Orlando moved to London in 1993 and began to work with small parts in such television dramas as ‘Casualty’ and ‘Midsomer Murders.’ Initially studying at the Fine Arts College, Hampstead, he spent two years at the National Youth Theatre, before receiving a scholarship with the British American Drama Academy.

In 1997, Orlando played a small part as a rent boy in the acclaimed movie, ‘Wilde,’ which starred Stephen Fry. Although he was then offered various other film roles, he decided to do more theatre and eventually began a new course of study at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

In 1998, Orlando was visiting a friend when he climbed onto a gutter to fix a jammed balcony door. He lost his footing and plunged three stories to the ground. Rushed to hospital, he underwent six hours of surgery that left him with plates and bolts in his back. His doctor broke to him the news that Orlando may never walk again.

But Orlando Bloom’s dream was stronger than that. He provided his own words of motivation, deciding that he would make himself walk again and would never let fear restrict his life.

Two weeks after being admitted into hospital, he haltingly walked out again. He resumed his studies and began acting on stage in such plays as ‘Twelfth Night.’ One night in 1999, the audience for one of the plays included movie director Peter Jackson, who approached Orlando after the show and asked him to audition for a film he was casting.

A few weeks later, the young actor graduated from college and went straight out to New Zealand, where he spent 18 months playing the physically demanding part of Legolas in the massively successful ‘Lord of the Rings’ trilogy.

Orlando Bloom is now one of the most sought-after actors with parts in several major movies such as ‘Black Hawk Down’ and ‘Pirates of the Caribbean.’ In 2005 he was finally cast in a leading role in the medieval epic ‘Kingdom of Heaven’ when he played alongside such greats as Jeremy Irons and Liam Neeson.

He is never too busy however to return to his roots in theatre. In 2007 he appeared in ‘Celebration,’ a play by David Storey, and is always happy to try new plays and films that are a bit different or low budget.

In 2010, Orlando Bloom married Miranda Kerr and, early in 2011, a son, Flynn Bloom, was born to the couple in Los Angeles.

Orlando lives most of his time in London however and regularly makes time to be with his family and friends away from acting. Despite his earlier experiences, he admits to being an adrenaline junkie; he regularly took part in bungee jumping, skiing, surfing, Rugby Union and skateboarding. He is a practising Buddhist and in 2009 was named a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, visiting schools in Nepal to support education and sanitation programmes.

Although one assumes fatherhood has toned his adventurous spirit, Orlando still has an insatiable zest for life, despite having broken his back, an arm, both legs, a wrist, a finger, a toe and his nose in various accidents. His philosophy provides words of motivation for all of us but Orlando Bloom is still phlegmatic about life: “People come into your life and people leave it… you just have to trust that life has a road mapped out for you.”

 

“I know you can be up one minute and drop the next, so I’m trying to maintain a steady course so I can have some longevity.”
 

Orlando Bloom
 
 

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Margaret Thatcher: A Source of Many Words of Motivation

 
 

Margaret Thatcher In Salisbury July 2005

 

“If you just set out to be liked, you would be prepared to compromise on anything at any time, and you would achieve nothing.”
 

Margaret Thatcher
 

Margaret Hilda Roberts was born on 13 October 1925 and died on 8 April 2013. Sadly some of her political opponents have made an attempt to disguise the extraordinary life of this tough woman, named ‘the Iron Lady’ by a Russian journalist, but her achievements will still be remembered by history.

She was born to Alf and Beatrice Roberts in a flat above one of his two grocery shops in Grantham, Lincolnshire. Alf was a Methodist preacher and an Independent alderman on the local council. Eventually he became the town Mayor.

Margaret went to the local school and received a scholarship to Kesteven and Grantham Girls School. She applied for a scholarship to study chemistry at Oxford but was rejected. Fortunately another student withdrew and Margaret studied for, and received, her degree. Her political career began at university, with the young Margaret becoming President of the Oxford University Conservative Association.

She began work as a research chemist and was selected as the Conservative candidate for Dartford in Kent. At the dinner after her selection she met the man she was to marry – Denis Thatcher. They married in December 1951 after Margaret had been beaten in two general elections.

This determined lady then studied Law and qualified as a Barrister in the same year as she gave birth to twins, Carol and Mark.

Once again she was defeated in another election before being elected Member of Parliament for Finchley in 1958. She rapidly made her mark in the Conservative party, working in the Ministry of Pensions before becoming the party’s spokesperson on Housing and Land. Other roles followed before she became Minister for Education in 1970. Throughout her career, Margaret was involved in economic and international discussions, attending lunches at the Institute of Economic Affairs.

In 1974, Margaret Thatcher succeeded Edward Heath as leader of the Conservative party. In 1979, after a loss of confidence in the Labour government, she became Britain’s first woman Prime Minister.

During her time in office, Mrs. Thatcher’s determination and strength were obvious to all. In many ways, she was the last Prime Minister with charisma and a belief in her policies. Her strength was particularly reflected in her determination to disrupt the power of the unions, who many felt had been at least partly responsible for the country’s economic woes in the 1970s, in her attitude to the terrorists in Northern Ireland and the Argentinian invasion of the Falkland Islands in 1982.

In 1984, Mrs. Thatcher narrowly escaped a bomb attack by the IRA in the Grand Hotel, Brighton. Five others were killed. It was characteristic of the woman that when the attack took place, at 3am, she was still in her study working. She was due to give a speech to the Conservative Party Conference next day and duly gave it as planned.

Throughout her premiership, Mrs. Thatcher was instrumental in foreign affairs, including the break-up of the USSR.

After a remarkable 11-year period in office, during which she achieved many of her aims and made many friends and enemies, Margaret Thatcher faced one too many leadership challenges and had to resign.

Her strong personality has resulted in many anecdotes. Lech Walesa, former President of Poland, remembers some advice Mrs. Thatcher gave him: “Write down the 10 steps from where you are now to where you want to be.” But she also had a human side too; Left-wing politician Tony Benn recalled seeing her at the funeral of Labour MP Eric Heffer, “I thanked her for coming and she burst into tears. She had come out of respect for someone whose opinions she disagreed with.”

If you want to know more about this charismatic politician, visit the Margaret Thatcher Foundation website.

 

“Disciplining yourself to do what you know is right and important, although difficult, is the highroad to pride, self-esteem, and personal satisfaction.”
 

Margaret Thatcher
 
 

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Inspiration Messages Come from Giving Goals a Timetable

 
 

Two Beautiful Fob Watches Lying On An Antique Desk

 

“Dreams are wonderful, but they are not enough. It’s not sufficient to have a brilliant painting of the desired result. To erect a magnificent structure one must also have a step-by-step blueprint of how to lay the foundation, support the structure, and so on. And for that we need goals.”

 

Jim Rohn
 

In our irregular series on setting goals, we have been outlining the characteristics of successful goals. We have been using the mnemonic SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timetable.

Today we examine the last of these: giving your goals a timetable.

The difference between a dream and a goal is a timetable for their achievement. A dream says ‘I would like this sometime’ while a goal defines what it is you want and sets a date for its achievement.

If you do not set a date for a goal’s achievement, you will be able to put it off and the urgency and purposefulness is lost. We need to define when we want to reach our destination.

Setting a timeframe once again requires you to be honest with yourself. You will know when you can realistically reach where you want to be. Give yourself a quiet time to think alone and you will understand when your goals can be reached.

You may well have goals in various areas of your life (family, career, sport and so on) upon which you will want to work one at a time. This means you need to have an overall holistic view of your goals in order to set a timetable that allows for the achievement of them all.

Long and Short Term Goals

It is no good having just big goals you want to achieve in, say, ten years’ time. The key is to set these long-term goals but also to have short-term goals that will build up to the bigger achievements.

The reason for having these ‘baby step’ goals is to keep your motivation going. When the going gets tough (as it should, or your goals are not stretching you enough) big goals can seem very far away and it is easy to lose your words of motivation to get you there. If you have smaller, more achievable goals your gradual success will keep your momentum going.

In his book, ‘See You at The Top,’ Zig Ziglar put it this way: “The only way to reach your long-term goals is through achieving short-term objectives. Keep your eye on your major objective, but remember as you reach your daily objectives you are getting closer and closer to those long-range goals.”

He also wrote, “It is so important as you set and seek any goal, to arrange it so you can enjoy some success of some kind virtually every day,”

Jim Rohn suggests setting goals for 1 year, 3 years, 5 years and 10 years to ensure you have a good spread between the goals. As he said, “The key here is to develop a balance between shorter-term and longer-term goals.”

If you have too many short-term goals than maybe you are not dreaming big enough. If you have too many long-term goals you should look for some smaller goals to give you the words of motivation you need or perhaps break down some baby step goals that will drive you towards your ultimate aim.

You may have a goal to become an internationally renowned concert pianist but can barely play ‘Chopsticks’ now (like me!). It is clear that your main goal is not going to be achieved overnight but it could be possible in five or ten years’ time. To help you move in the right direction (and stay motivated) you might set shorter-term goals such as ‘find a top piano teacher,’ ‘get my piano exams,’ ‘play to my family,’ ‘play in the local community centre’ and so forth.

Having a list of short-term goals leading to the larger goals will build the excitement, make you feel you are on you way to where you want to be and will give you the words of motivation you need to keep the momentum, going. One day you will suddenly realise your life has improved in line with your wildest dreams.
 

“In the game of life you will discover, as you set your goals and unlock your own mind, that the world will unlock its treasures and rewards to you.”
 

Zig Ziglar
 
 

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Words For Motivation To Make Goals Relevant

 
 

Young Man In Spectacles In Black Surround

 
Over the last few weeks we have been finding words for motivation to set and achieve goals to direct us towards the lives we want. As part of this, we have been applying the mnemonic SMART to identify the features of those goals.

This means the goals should be Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and have a Timetable applied.

Today we need to find the words of motivation to ensure we make these aspirations Relevant.

To make them work, any goals you set must be relevant to you and nobody else. Never allow anyone to dictate what you want out of life. It may be alien to your way of thinking but you need to be selfish for the time being.

You may want to help other people as part of your ambitions but you cannot help others if you do not have your own life in order. The first step therefore is to ensure you are heading in the right direction – in other ways, to get the goals in place that will improve your own life.

You may be tempted to set goals to please someone close to you but, if your relationship with that person deteriorates, the words of motivation you need to pursue your goals will evaporate. This will then mean your personal development will grind to a halt.

If you set goals according to your own timetable and needs then fewer distractions will derail your journey. In any case, if you link your motivation to someone else and the going gets tough, your relationship with that person will be under strain. You may even blame that other person for your problems. I know, I have been there myself.

Worried that other people will not understand if you insist on following your own path? It is certainly possible that will happen but, believe me, in the long term everyone of any value will respect you for your strength.

Those that do not understand probably do not love you for yourself and can be discounted.

The goals we set should certainly also be relevant to what we consider important in life. Our ambitions should not clash with our values or else the words of motivation they produce will be meaningless. For example, if you value your family and fidelity to your partner, then a goal to spend years traveling around the world on your own will not match with that belief.

For goals to work, they must encounter as few contradictions as possible.

This also means all your ambitions should agree with each other. If one goal clashes with another, then you are less likely to achieve what you want. Should you want to leave work and work for yourself then it is unlikely a goal to get promotion over the same timescale will have any relevance to you.

Believe me, there will be plenty of challenges to be faced without creating your own confusion.
 

“The more intensely we feel about an idea or a goal, the more assuredly the idea, buried deep in our subconscious, will direct us along the path to its fulfilment.”

Earl Nightingale
 
 

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Words For Motivation: Chasing Goals Is Easier With Others

 
 

Family Group Holding Their Mother Across Their Arms

 
Sadly too many of us try to achieve what we want in life while spending time around those who cannot give us any inspiration messages.

There are too many people who don’t want to see you do well as your success would then show how they little they had managed (or so they think). You then do not find the words of motivation you need to pursue your goals.

Your power to drive ahead in your life is expanded if you can find people to be around who think the same as you and motivate you to do better. The right people will have high expectations of you and will encourage you to succeed through words of motivation.

You may be lucky to already have such people in your life, in your family or close friends, for these individuals truly feel love for you. However this may not necessarily be the case.

So how do you find people who will support you?

It is possible to sit your family and friends down and honestly explain just why you want what you want – and how it could benefit them. If they love you, they may well then understand you need support and do all they can to see you receive it.

If you have children, they can become your best cheerleaders. I have known families where the children will tell their parents off if they weaken and do not do what is needed to achieve their goals!

Otherwise, and if you have the time, you might be able to pull together a group of like-minded people. You could even organize regular get-togethers to discuss individual goals and sources of inspiration: perhaps a monthly social event might do the trick. Such meetings would give you a group to whom you would be accountable. It is a lot harder to put off what you need to do if you know you will have to tell others why.

Where would you find such people? That is more difficult but talking to others when you are out and about – at social events or at work – might identify people who think like you.

Such a group might even help you overcome obstacles in the way of your goals. Napoleon Hill describes the ‘Master Mind Principle,’ where a group of individuals can give power to the individual, in his book ‘Think And Grow Rich.’

“When a group of individual brains are coordinated and function in harmony, the increased energy created through that alliance becomes available to every individual brain in that group.”

But supposing you still cannot find anyone to support you?

Whatever happens you could get into the habit of listening to and reading about people who have inspiration messages to get you thinking the right way. There are plenty of books, CDs, DVDs and downloads that can help you tap into the minds of great teachers. Often such people hold seminars and give talks: get to those for a motivation boost.

The Internet can certainly help to find individuals to support you. There are plenty of online forums and groups where you can find words of motivation to help you. Equally, finding the right people on social media and you can pick their brains for inspiration.

The online revolution of recent years means no-one need to be alone in working towards their goals. Of course there will always be those who will try to derail you attempts to do better but ignore them. Keep your mind open and look for those who want to help and you will find the inspiration messages and support you need.
 
 

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Short Inspiring Stories: Emily Maguire Overcomes The Odds

 
 

Black And White Image Of Emily Maguire Performing

 
The music industry is a tough place to be. Anyone wanting to become a successful musician needs all the inspiration messages they can get, so to start out with a disadvantage makes the journey all the more tough.

Emily Maguire was born in South London in 1975. Growing up alongside her loving sister and watching no television, Emily developed a passion for poetry and music early on. She learned to play the piano, flute, recorder and cello and loved reading books.

Her early passion was for classical music and it seemed like she was destined to be a professional cellist. The young Emily was a normal sight at competitions and even took a master class with famous cellist Paul Tortelier.

Sadly Emily’s teenage years were stressful, due to problems at home, and at the age of 16 she left college and moved into a flat in Cambridge with total strangers. She soon started to show the signs of acute depression, considering suicide and writing disturbing notes. Emily lived on nothing but Crunchy Nut Cornflakes for some months and listening to Bob Marley tapes.

A psychiatrist had to bully Emily into taking medication and eventually she began to recover.

After a period in France, Emily moved in with her mother and returned to college. A car crash soon after however triggered fibromyalgia pain syndrome, which left her only able to move on walking sticks and in great pain.

For her birthday, Emily’s mother gave her a guitar: this was the saving moment for Emily. A friend suggested she tried combining her loves of poetry and music by writing songs. Incredibly having time on her hands else became an asset to Emily as she began to write constantly.

Emily tried many therapies and drugs to alleviate her condition but found only cannabis made any difference. At the age of 21, Emily found herself sat in a hospital garden in total despair when words of motivation, saying ‘I can, I can,’ sounded in her ears. For a moment, she felt utter joy for the first time for a long time.

In 1998, Emily dislocated a rib, which caused seemingly impossible pain. She chain-smoked cannabis, stopped eating and sleeping and wrote constantly. At the age of 23, she was taken to a mental hospital and was diagnosed with an extreme case of bipolar disorder.

For weeks she was kept in a ward with other mental health patients, wanting to talk to doctors but the drugs she was given made her unable to speak.

Eventually she was allowed to go home, where Emily decided to find an alternative to drugs to help her recover. She found inspiration messages in ‘The Way To Freedom’ by the Dalai Lama and visited a Buddhist teacher. He taught her how to meditate and this helped her tackle each day more easily.
 

Emily Maguire At The Microphone

 
After a few months, Emily expressed her feelings in a song called ‘I Thought I Saw’ and then ‘I’d Rather Be.’ After 10 years of pain, she found natural treatments that alleviated her pain and began to consider singing in public.

Her great-uncle bombarded her with words of motivation and forced Emily to sing her first concert at the Square and Compass pub in Dorset. This lead to several other gigs and eventually she ended up nervously singing in the Half Moon in Putney, London. Emily was amazed when she received thunderous applause.

Sadly in 2002, Emily returned to a mental hospital. This time however, she was given fewer drugs and was encouraged to play her guitar. Nonetheless Emily tried to escape several times but even so she began to recover slowly. In hospital she wrote the song ‘Falling On My Feet.’

Eventually she moved in with her father near Cambridge and then back to London. Suddenly she received a phone call from an Australian musician and producer she had met some years earlier. He invited her to visit him. By chance, Emily found she had just enough money to fly to Australia – so she went.

Christian, her friend, lived in a shack in the bush and Emily felt immediately at home. He gave her the words of motivation she needed to start playing again and together they recorded all her songs.

Emily’s visa expired so she returned to London. The draw of Australia was too much however and she was back in Australia in 2003. Emily was encouraged to release an album (‘Stranger Place’) and was astonished when it was a hit, leading to several engagements in the area.

News of her success reached London and suddenly there were invitations to play in England. Nationwide tours resulted before Emily returned home to record her second album (‘Keep Walking’).

Another tour of the UK led to an appearance on BBC Radio Two. As a result, Emily started a further tour of the UK and Ireland with Don McLean. Suddenly she found herself playing to up to 4,000 people at a time and having to deal with interest from the media.

Emily now regularly plays to audiences of different sizes and has released a third album (‘Believer’). She still lives under the threat of reoccurrences of her mental illness and has to take medication and meditate to combat this.

Interestingly, Emily is recording a fourth album, which is being financed largely by sponsorship from fans. Her work has always been encouraged by inspiration messages and money from fans. This extraordinary woman has overcome the most amazing challenges, both from mental health and finances, to become one of the most talented singers around.

The inspiration messages she gives us mean nothing seems impossible anymore.

Find out more about Emily Maguire on her website. You can also see her at several venues, including her return to the picturesque Square and Compass, Worth Matravers, Dorset on 1 June 2013.
 

“Well I’ll say,
Go slow, be kind, be wise
Start over again, just start over again.”

 

Emily Maguire (‘Start Over Again’)

 


 

 
 

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Words Of Motivation To Keep Your Goals On Track

 
 

Japanese Archer Aiming At A Target

 
You may have already set yourself some meaningful goals but somehow you get distracted. You can see yourself achieving a better life – the life you want – but somehow these ambitions and goals do not provide the inspiration messages you need.

What can be wrong?

Keep It Simple

I can tell you that for years I have read many words of motivation that encourage me to work for the future I want, but I get distracted by the obstacles and events that life throws in my path.

One of the problems encountered in the journey on the way to becoming the person you want to be is having too many goals.

To get to where you want to be however you need to keep it all simple. Focus on just one goal at a time. This way you can keep your focus and achieve so much more: anything else means you run the risk of being overwhelmed and losing confidence.

Each day you should have one defined goal you are aiming towards. As we have said before, the words for motivation as to how to achieve that goal will make themselves known once you have a clear objective.

Make Discipline Easy

Now you know what you are aiming for every day, it becomes much easier to work towards it. We will discuss the importance of discipline at a later stage but making your vision of the future clearer and simpler will remove many of the excuses you may have to put off doing what is needed.

As entertainer and author Wes Beavis says in his book ‘Become The Person You Dream Of Becoming’: “There is nothing like the satisfaction of work, when you can feel it transporting you towards your goal. What brings the drudgery into activity is the lack of felt purpose for the activity.”

Have one clear goal to aim towards every day and you will find the words for motivation you need to work for it.
 
 

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Inspiration Messages From Aung San Suu Kyi

 
 

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi Talking To British Government Ministers

 
It sometimes seems that figures from the past offer the most effective words for motivation but there are many people alive today whose stories provide inspiration messages for all of us.

During the 1970’s a young mother was listening to the radio in her home in Oxfordshire with her young son. Together they listened to the BBC programme ‘Desert Island Discs.’ On this programme, well-known people are interviewed and asked what items they consider so valuable that they would them amongst the few possessions they could take to a desert island. Primary among these items are pieces of music they hold dear.

The son turned to his mother and asked if she thought she would ever be invited to speak on the programme. She answered “Why not?” The little boy was curious why his mother might be included. “I considered this for a moment and then answered: ‘Perhaps because I’d have won the Nobel Prize for literature,” and we both laughed. The prospect seemed pleasant but hardly probable.”

This story was recounted by Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese campaigner for democracy, during her speech made in Oslo on 16 June 2012 to accept the Nobel Peace Prize awarded to her in 1991. It provides words of motivation for all of us.

Suu Kyi was born on 19 June 1945 in Rangoon, now known as Yangon. She was born into Burmese politics as her father, Aung San, oversaw the countries independence from Britain in 1947. Sadly he was then assassinated that same year.

She had two brothers, although one was drowned at the age of eight, and she was initially educated in the country of her birth. Her mother became a leading political figure herself and the young Suu Kyi met a wide range of people from different backgrounds and beliefs. Khin Kyi (the mother) became ambassador to India and Suu Kyi went to school and college in New Delhi, emerging with a degree in politics.

Suu Kyi then went to Oxford and gained a further degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics before moving to New York to work at the United Nations.

In 1972, she married Dr. Michael Aris, a leading scholar of eastern culture and they had two sons, Alexander and Kim. The family lived in Oxfordshire and, in 1987, Suu Kyi gained a Masters degree in Burmese literature from the London School of Oriental and African Studies.

Suu Kyi returned to Burma in 1988 to visit her ailing mother but stayed to lead the pro-democracy movement. At the time a dictator, U Ne Win, who slaughtered any opposition to his rule, dominated the country. Suu Kyi began to give words of motivation to democracy and human rights campaigners. Although all protests were entirely non-violent, in 1989 Suu Kyi was placed under house arrest and spent 15 of the next 21 years in detention.

U Ne Win renamed the country the Union of Myanmar in 1989 and told Suu Kyi she would be freed if she agreed to leave the country. She refused saying that she would oppose the government until a democratic regime was in place.
 

Young Burmese Pro Democracy Protestor Holding A Placard

 
In 1990, an election was held and the National League For Democracy won more than 80 percent of the vote. Predictably the government ignored the result, eventually declaring it void.

Suu Kyi was released in 1995, set up an alternative ruling body and was placed under arrest once more in September 2000. In 2003 she was released again until the democracy movement clashed with government supporters and Suu Kyi returned to house arrest.

Sadly Michael Aris only saw his wife five times during her time in Burma and died of cancer in 1999 and her two boys did not see her before 2011, when they were allowed to visit her.

International pressure grew around the time of Aris’ illness and the United Nations and Pope John Paul II put pressure on the Burmese government to allow a visa for him. This came to nothing but with the new century came calls for Suu Kyis release from all around the world.

In 2008 a cyclone hit her house and she lost all electricity, repairs were only planned the following year.

Eventually, in 2010, another election was held but the National League for Democracy was disbanded just before so the ruling junta won the election unopposed. Suu Kyi was finally released six days later. The following year however the NLD reformed and, in the light of increased international pressure, forced a new election, which took place in 2012. Suu Kyi finally won office.

Having won a wide variety of awards, in January 2013, Aung San Suu Kyi finally appeared on the BBC Radio 4 programme, Desert Island Discs. Of course she had words of motivation for us all. A committed Buddhist Daw Suu (‘Mother Suu,’ the name the people of Burma have given her) is phlegmatic about her life. “I’m not terrible fond of melodrama,” she said, “When people have chosen a certain path, they should walk it with satisfaction and not try to make it appear as a tremendous sacrifice.”

On her website Aung San Suu Kyi dispenses some essential words of motivation: “It is not enough merely to call for freedom, democracy and human rights. There has to be a united determination to preserve in the struggle, to make sacrifices in the name of enduring truths, to resist the corrupting influences of desire, ill will, ignorance and fear.”

The life of this great heroine should offer all of us inspiration messages to help us understand that we should find a worthwhile cause and pursue it.
 

“It is not power that corrupts but fear. Fear of losing power corrupts those who wield it and fear of the scourge of power corrupts those who are subject to it.”

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi

 

 
 

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Motivational Phrases: Making Goals Achievable.

 
 

Road Leading Away Through Scrub Towards A Mountain

 

“If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or things.”
Albert Einstein

There have been many words of motivation spoken and written about how to set goals that work. In previous articles, I have tried to provide inspiration messages that explore the characteristics of successful goal setting using the mnemonic SMART.

The third element (‘A’) represents Achievable: to give yourself a better chance of reaching your goals, they need to be achievable.

To me, this is probably the most difficult part to understand – and therefore the most significant. What dictates when a goal is achievable? There are lots of words of motivation that tell us to aim high but when are we aiming too high to make achievement impossible?

What is realistic?

As I understand it, we need to find goals that have a reasonable chance of being accomplished. The more difficult goals need a bit more time and effort but, in theory, almost anything is possible if we strive hard enough and are single-minded enough.

But no matter how strong the words of motivation you receive, setting an outcome that just seems impossible will be demotivating. Many difficult goals can be achieved but somehow we need to be able to believe in our abilities to get there when times get tough – and they will get hard or the goal is not stretching you enough.

I find the analogy of the horizon useful. Stand in any landscape and you can see a horizon. Aim for the furthest point you can see and walk towards it. As you progress, you will start to see a further horizon, and another, and another, and another. In time you can cover a great distance simply by walking towards the horizon.

Perhaps an inspiration message could come from the world of hiking and exploring and using a compass. Sometimes you might be following a course through wild country and the fog, mist, rain or even snow might come down and obscure the route forward.

In such cases you could stop and wait for the weather to clear but you might also decide to whip out your trusty compass and use that instead. The best way to navigate your route where you can only see a short distance ahead is to use a map to work out the magnetic bearing to your ultimate destination, and set it on your compass. You then aim your compass in the direction you want to go, look for the feature that is at the furthest point you can see on that bearing and walk towards that. Once you get to that point, find the next furthest point in the right direction and continue.

In this way you will reach your destination a stage at a time and so it is with goal setting. You simply need to set a smaller goal that you can see yourself achieving but that will move you closer to your ultimate goal in baby steps. This will give you the inspiration messages you need to get there.
 

Young Woman Aiming A Compass At A Mountain Ridge

 
I might want to build a new conservatory on my house, for example. A contractor has given me an estimate of £16 000 to do the work. There is no way I could afford that now. What I might do however is to set monthly goals: perhaps I could save £1000 the first month, £2000 the next month and so on. In a few months I will have the money I need.

Concentrate on achieving the smaller goals and you will have the inspiration messages you need to easily reach the main target.

Working to achieve the life you want includes several ironies and one is that you may often need to sacrifice the very thing you want to achieve in order to get to where you want to be.

If you want to spend more time with your family, for example, you may have to dedicate less time with them to start with in order to work for your goal. If you want to earn more money, you may need to invest money to get there. It is possible however to be smart in doing this: in the example of spending time with your family, you might include them in your work and make them your biggest providers of inspiration messages.

Working towards a goal is always easier if you are realistic and identify exactly what it is you need to sacrifice in order to seize the final prize.

You need to understand what the price of your goal will be. It may be in the form of money that needs to be spent, a change in habits, less time at home, additional education, or extra effort or time beyond that which you already expend.

Once you have understood the task you face then the task will be less daunting and the words of motivation easier to find. Knowing what you face reduces the mystery of the whole project.

So there you have it: set goals you feel you can achieve, but there are always words of motivation and ways to help make many of the highest goals achievable.
 

“Never look down to test the ground before taking your next step; only he who keeps his eye fixed on the far horizon will find the right road.”

Dag Hammarskjold

 
 

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