Inspirational Messages For LIfe

Hypeless Messages To Show Life Is Not Hopeless

Words For Motivation To Make Goals Relevant

 
 

Young Man In Spectacles In Black Surround

 
Over the last few weeks we have been finding words for motivation to set and achieve goals to direct us towards the lives we want. As part of this, we have been applying the mnemonic SMART to identify the features of those goals.

This means the goals should be Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and have a Timetable applied.

Today we need to find the words of motivation to ensure we make these aspirations Relevant.

To make them work, any goals you set must be relevant to you and nobody else. Never allow anyone to dictate what you want out of life. It may be alien to your way of thinking but you need to be selfish for the time being.

You may want to help other people as part of your ambitions but you cannot help others if you do not have your own life in order. The first step therefore is to ensure you are heading in the right direction – in other ways, to get the goals in place that will improve your own life.

You may be tempted to set goals to please someone close to you but, if your relationship with that person deteriorates, the words of motivation you need to pursue your goals will evaporate. This will then mean your personal development will grind to a halt.

If you set goals according to your own timetable and needs then fewer distractions will derail your journey. In any case, if you link your motivation to someone else and the going gets tough, your relationship with that person will be under strain. You may even blame that other person for your problems. I know, I have been there myself.

Worried that other people will not understand if you insist on following your own path? It is certainly possible that will happen but, believe me, in the long term everyone of any value will respect you for your strength.

Those that do not understand probably do not love you for yourself and can be discounted.

The goals we set should certainly also be relevant to what we consider important in life. Our ambitions should not clash with our values or else the words of motivation they produce will be meaningless. For example, if you value your family and fidelity to your partner, then a goal to spend years traveling around the world on your own will not match with that belief.

For goals to work, they must encounter as few contradictions as possible.

This also means all your ambitions should agree with each other. If one goal clashes with another, then you are less likely to achieve what you want. Should you want to leave work and work for yourself then it is unlikely a goal to get promotion over the same timescale will have any relevance to you.

Believe me, there will be plenty of challenges to be faced without creating your own confusion.
 

“The more intensely we feel about an idea or a goal, the more assuredly the idea, buried deep in our subconscious, will direct us along the path to its fulfilment.”

Earl Nightingale
 
 

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Words For Motivation: Chasing Goals Is Easier With Others

 
 

Family Group Holding Their Mother Across Their Arms

 
Sadly too many of us try to achieve what we want in life while spending time around those who cannot give us any inspiration messages.

There are too many people who don’t want to see you do well as your success would then show how they little they had managed (or so they think). You then do not find the words of motivation you need to pursue your goals.

Your power to drive ahead in your life is expanded if you can find people to be around who think the same as you and motivate you to do better. The right people will have high expectations of you and will encourage you to succeed through words of motivation.

You may be lucky to already have such people in your life, in your family or close friends, for these individuals truly feel love for you. However this may not necessarily be the case.

So how do you find people who will support you?

It is possible to sit your family and friends down and honestly explain just why you want what you want – and how it could benefit them. If they love you, they may well then understand you need support and do all they can to see you receive it.

If you have children, they can become your best cheerleaders. I have known families where the children will tell their parents off if they weaken and do not do what is needed to achieve their goals!

Otherwise, and if you have the time, you might be able to pull together a group of like-minded people. You could even organize regular get-togethers to discuss individual goals and sources of inspiration: perhaps a monthly social event might do the trick. Such meetings would give you a group to whom you would be accountable. It is a lot harder to put off what you need to do if you know you will have to tell others why.

Where would you find such people? That is more difficult but talking to others when you are out and about – at social events or at work – might identify people who think like you.

Such a group might even help you overcome obstacles in the way of your goals. Napoleon Hill describes the ‘Master Mind Principle,’ where a group of individuals can give power to the individual, in his book ‘Think And Grow Rich.’

“When a group of individual brains are coordinated and function in harmony, the increased energy created through that alliance becomes available to every individual brain in that group.”

But supposing you still cannot find anyone to support you?

Whatever happens you could get into the habit of listening to and reading about people who have inspiration messages to get you thinking the right way. There are plenty of books, CDs, DVDs and downloads that can help you tap into the minds of great teachers. Often such people hold seminars and give talks: get to those for a motivation boost.

The Internet can certainly help to find individuals to support you. There are plenty of online forums and groups where you can find words of motivation to help you. Equally, finding the right people on social media and you can pick their brains for inspiration.

The online revolution of recent years means no-one need to be alone in working towards their goals. Of course there will always be those who will try to derail you attempts to do better but ignore them. Keep your mind open and look for those who want to help and you will find the inspiration messages and support you need.
 
 

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Short Inspiring Stories: Emily Maguire Overcomes The Odds

 
 

Black And White Image Of Emily Maguire Performing

 
The music industry is a tough place to be. Anyone wanting to become a successful musician needs all the inspiration messages they can get, so to start out with a disadvantage makes the journey all the more tough.

Emily Maguire was born in South London in 1975. Growing up alongside her loving sister and watching no television, Emily developed a passion for poetry and music early on. She learned to play the piano, flute, recorder and cello and loved reading books.

Her early passion was for classical music and it seemed like she was destined to be a professional cellist. The young Emily was a normal sight at competitions and even took a master class with famous cellist Paul Tortelier.

Sadly Emily’s teenage years were stressful, due to problems at home, and at the age of 16 she left college and moved into a flat in Cambridge with total strangers. She soon started to show the signs of acute depression, considering suicide and writing disturbing notes. Emily lived on nothing but Crunchy Nut Cornflakes for some months and listening to Bob Marley tapes.

A psychiatrist had to bully Emily into taking medication and eventually she began to recover.

After a period in France, Emily moved in with her mother and returned to college. A car crash soon after however triggered fibromyalgia pain syndrome, which left her only able to move on walking sticks and in great pain.

For her birthday, Emily’s mother gave her a guitar: this was the saving moment for Emily. A friend suggested she tried combining her loves of poetry and music by writing songs. Incredibly having time on her hands else became an asset to Emily as she began to write constantly.

Emily tried many therapies and drugs to alleviate her condition but found only cannabis made any difference. At the age of 21, Emily found herself sat in a hospital garden in total despair when words of motivation, saying ‘I can, I can,’ sounded in her ears. For a moment, she felt utter joy for the first time for a long time.

In 1998, Emily dislocated a rib, which caused seemingly impossible pain. She chain-smoked cannabis, stopped eating and sleeping and wrote constantly. At the age of 23, she was taken to a mental hospital and was diagnosed with an extreme case of bipolar disorder.

For weeks she was kept in a ward with other mental health patients, wanting to talk to doctors but the drugs she was given made her unable to speak.

Eventually she was allowed to go home, where Emily decided to find an alternative to drugs to help her recover. She found inspiration messages in ‘The Way To Freedom’ by the Dalai Lama and visited a Buddhist teacher. He taught her how to meditate and this helped her tackle each day more easily.
 

Emily Maguire At The Microphone

 
After a few months, Emily expressed her feelings in a song called ‘I Thought I Saw’ and then ‘I’d Rather Be.’ After 10 years of pain, she found natural treatments that alleviated her pain and began to consider singing in public.

Her great-uncle bombarded her with words of motivation and forced Emily to sing her first concert at the Square and Compass pub in Dorset. This lead to several other gigs and eventually she ended up nervously singing in the Half Moon in Putney, London. Emily was amazed when she received thunderous applause.

Sadly in 2002, Emily returned to a mental hospital. This time however, she was given fewer drugs and was encouraged to play her guitar. Nonetheless Emily tried to escape several times but even so she began to recover slowly. In hospital she wrote the song ‘Falling On My Feet.’

Eventually she moved in with her father near Cambridge and then back to London. Suddenly she received a phone call from an Australian musician and producer she had met some years earlier. He invited her to visit him. By chance, Emily found she had just enough money to fly to Australia – so she went.

Christian, her friend, lived in a shack in the bush and Emily felt immediately at home. He gave her the words of motivation she needed to start playing again and together they recorded all her songs.

Emily’s visa expired so she returned to London. The draw of Australia was too much however and she was back in Australia in 2003. Emily was encouraged to release an album (‘Stranger Place’) and was astonished when it was a hit, leading to several engagements in the area.

News of her success reached London and suddenly there were invitations to play in England. Nationwide tours resulted before Emily returned home to record her second album (‘Keep Walking’).

Another tour of the UK led to an appearance on BBC Radio Two. As a result, Emily started a further tour of the UK and Ireland with Don McLean. Suddenly she found herself playing to up to 4,000 people at a time and having to deal with interest from the media.

Emily now regularly plays to audiences of different sizes and has released a third album (‘Believer’). She still lives under the threat of reoccurrences of her mental illness and has to take medication and meditate to combat this.

Interestingly, Emily is recording a fourth album, which is being financed largely by sponsorship from fans. Her work has always been encouraged by inspiration messages and money from fans. This extraordinary woman has overcome the most amazing challenges, both from mental health and finances, to become one of the most talented singers around.

The inspiration messages she gives us mean nothing seems impossible anymore.

Find out more about Emily Maguire on her website. You can also see her at several venues, including her return to the picturesque Square and Compass, Worth Matravers, Dorset on 1 June 2013.
 

“Well I’ll say,
Go slow, be kind, be wise
Start over again, just start over again.”

 

Emily Maguire (‘Start Over Again’)

 


 

 
 

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Words Of Motivation To Keep Your Goals On Track

 
 

Japanese Archer Aiming At A Target

 
You may have already set yourself some meaningful goals but somehow you get distracted. You can see yourself achieving a better life – the life you want – but somehow these ambitions and goals do not provide the inspiration messages you need.

What can be wrong?

Keep It Simple

I can tell you that for years I have read many words of motivation that encourage me to work for the future I want, but I get distracted by the obstacles and events that life throws in my path.

One of the problems encountered in the journey on the way to becoming the person you want to be is having too many goals.

To get to where you want to be however you need to keep it all simple. Focus on just one goal at a time. This way you can keep your focus and achieve so much more: anything else means you run the risk of being overwhelmed and losing confidence.

Each day you should have one defined goal you are aiming towards. As we have said before, the words for motivation as to how to achieve that goal will make themselves known once you have a clear objective.

Make Discipline Easy

Now you know what you are aiming for every day, it becomes much easier to work towards it. We will discuss the importance of discipline at a later stage but making your vision of the future clearer and simpler will remove many of the excuses you may have to put off doing what is needed.

As entertainer and author Wes Beavis says in his book ‘Become The Person You Dream Of Becoming’: “There is nothing like the satisfaction of work, when you can feel it transporting you towards your goal. What brings the drudgery into activity is the lack of felt purpose for the activity.”

Have one clear goal to aim towards every day and you will find the words for motivation you need to work for it.
 
 

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Inspiration Messages From Aung San Suu Kyi

 
 

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi Talking To British Government Ministers

 
It sometimes seems that figures from the past offer the most effective words for motivation but there are many people alive today whose stories provide inspiration messages for all of us.

During the 1970’s a young mother was listening to the radio in her home in Oxfordshire with her young son. Together they listened to the BBC programme ‘Desert Island Discs.’ On this programme, well-known people are interviewed and asked what items they consider so valuable that they would them amongst the few possessions they could take to a desert island. Primary among these items are pieces of music they hold dear.

The son turned to his mother and asked if she thought she would ever be invited to speak on the programme. She answered “Why not?” The little boy was curious why his mother might be included. “I considered this for a moment and then answered: ‘Perhaps because I’d have won the Nobel Prize for literature,” and we both laughed. The prospect seemed pleasant but hardly probable.”

This story was recounted by Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese campaigner for democracy, during her speech made in Oslo on 16 June 2012 to accept the Nobel Peace Prize awarded to her in 1991. It provides words of motivation for all of us.

Suu Kyi was born on 19 June 1945 in Rangoon, now known as Yangon. She was born into Burmese politics as her father, Aung San, oversaw the countries independence from Britain in 1947. Sadly he was then assassinated that same year.

She had two brothers, although one was drowned at the age of eight, and she was initially educated in the country of her birth. Her mother became a leading political figure herself and the young Suu Kyi met a wide range of people from different backgrounds and beliefs. Khin Kyi (the mother) became ambassador to India and Suu Kyi went to school and college in New Delhi, emerging with a degree in politics.

Suu Kyi then went to Oxford and gained a further degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics before moving to New York to work at the United Nations.

In 1972, she married Dr. Michael Aris, a leading scholar of eastern culture and they had two sons, Alexander and Kim. The family lived in Oxfordshire and, in 1987, Suu Kyi gained a Masters degree in Burmese literature from the London School of Oriental and African Studies.

Suu Kyi returned to Burma in 1988 to visit her ailing mother but stayed to lead the pro-democracy movement. At the time a dictator, U Ne Win, who slaughtered any opposition to his rule, dominated the country. Suu Kyi began to give words of motivation to democracy and human rights campaigners. Although all protests were entirely non-violent, in 1989 Suu Kyi was placed under house arrest and spent 15 of the next 21 years in detention.

U Ne Win renamed the country the Union of Myanmar in 1989 and told Suu Kyi she would be freed if she agreed to leave the country. She refused saying that she would oppose the government until a democratic regime was in place.
 

Young Burmese Pro Democracy Protestor Holding A Placard

 
In 1990, an election was held and the National League For Democracy won more than 80 percent of the vote. Predictably the government ignored the result, eventually declaring it void.

Suu Kyi was released in 1995, set up an alternative ruling body and was placed under arrest once more in September 2000. In 2003 she was released again until the democracy movement clashed with government supporters and Suu Kyi returned to house arrest.

Sadly Michael Aris only saw his wife five times during her time in Burma and died of cancer in 1999 and her two boys did not see her before 2011, when they were allowed to visit her.

International pressure grew around the time of Aris’ illness and the United Nations and Pope John Paul II put pressure on the Burmese government to allow a visa for him. This came to nothing but with the new century came calls for Suu Kyis release from all around the world.

In 2008 a cyclone hit her house and she lost all electricity, repairs were only planned the following year.

Eventually, in 2010, another election was held but the National League for Democracy was disbanded just before so the ruling junta won the election unopposed. Suu Kyi was finally released six days later. The following year however the NLD reformed and, in the light of increased international pressure, forced a new election, which took place in 2012. Suu Kyi finally won office.

Having won a wide variety of awards, in January 2013, Aung San Suu Kyi finally appeared on the BBC Radio 4 programme, Desert Island Discs. Of course she had words of motivation for us all. A committed Buddhist Daw Suu (‘Mother Suu,’ the name the people of Burma have given her) is phlegmatic about her life. “I’m not terrible fond of melodrama,” she said, “When people have chosen a certain path, they should walk it with satisfaction and not try to make it appear as a tremendous sacrifice.”

On her website Aung San Suu Kyi dispenses some essential words of motivation: “It is not enough merely to call for freedom, democracy and human rights. There has to be a united determination to preserve in the struggle, to make sacrifices in the name of enduring truths, to resist the corrupting influences of desire, ill will, ignorance and fear.”

The life of this great heroine should offer all of us inspiration messages to help us understand that we should find a worthwhile cause and pursue it.
 

“It is not power that corrupts but fear. Fear of losing power corrupts those who wield it and fear of the scourge of power corrupts those who are subject to it.”

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi

 

 
 

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Motivational Phrases: Making Goals Achievable.

 
 

Road Leading Away Through Scrub Towards A Mountain

 

“If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or things.”
Albert Einstein

There have been many words of motivation spoken and written about how to set goals that work. In previous articles, I have tried to provide inspiration messages that explore the characteristics of successful goal setting using the mnemonic SMART.

The third element (‘A’) represents Achievable: to give yourself a better chance of reaching your goals, they need to be achievable.

To me, this is probably the most difficult part to understand – and therefore the most significant. What dictates when a goal is achievable? There are lots of words of motivation that tell us to aim high but when are we aiming too high to make achievement impossible?

What is realistic?

As I understand it, we need to find goals that have a reasonable chance of being accomplished. The more difficult goals need a bit more time and effort but, in theory, almost anything is possible if we strive hard enough and are single-minded enough.

But no matter how strong the words of motivation you receive, setting an outcome that just seems impossible will be demotivating. Many difficult goals can be achieved but somehow we need to be able to believe in our abilities to get there when times get tough – and they will get hard or the goal is not stretching you enough.

I find the analogy of the horizon useful. Stand in any landscape and you can see a horizon. Aim for the furthest point you can see and walk towards it. As you progress, you will start to see a further horizon, and another, and another, and another. In time you can cover a great distance simply by walking towards the horizon.

Perhaps an inspiration message could come from the world of hiking and exploring and using a compass. Sometimes you might be following a course through wild country and the fog, mist, rain or even snow might come down and obscure the route forward.

In such cases you could stop and wait for the weather to clear but you might also decide to whip out your trusty compass and use that instead. The best way to navigate your route where you can only see a short distance ahead is to use a map to work out the magnetic bearing to your ultimate destination, and set it on your compass. You then aim your compass in the direction you want to go, look for the feature that is at the furthest point you can see on that bearing and walk towards that. Once you get to that point, find the next furthest point in the right direction and continue.

In this way you will reach your destination a stage at a time and so it is with goal setting. You simply need to set a smaller goal that you can see yourself achieving but that will move you closer to your ultimate goal in baby steps. This will give you the inspiration messages you need to get there.
 

Young Woman Aiming A Compass At A Mountain Ridge

 
I might want to build a new conservatory on my house, for example. A contractor has given me an estimate of £16 000 to do the work. There is no way I could afford that now. What I might do however is to set monthly goals: perhaps I could save £1000 the first month, £2000 the next month and so on. In a few months I will have the money I need.

Concentrate on achieving the smaller goals and you will have the inspiration messages you need to easily reach the main target.

Working to achieve the life you want includes several ironies and one is that you may often need to sacrifice the very thing you want to achieve in order to get to where you want to be.

If you want to spend more time with your family, for example, you may have to dedicate less time with them to start with in order to work for your goal. If you want to earn more money, you may need to invest money to get there. It is possible however to be smart in doing this: in the example of spending time with your family, you might include them in your work and make them your biggest providers of inspiration messages.

Working towards a goal is always easier if you are realistic and identify exactly what it is you need to sacrifice in order to seize the final prize.

You need to understand what the price of your goal will be. It may be in the form of money that needs to be spent, a change in habits, less time at home, additional education, or extra effort or time beyond that which you already expend.

Once you have understood the task you face then the task will be less daunting and the words of motivation easier to find. Knowing what you face reduces the mystery of the whole project.

So there you have it: set goals you feel you can achieve, but there are always words of motivation and ways to help make many of the highest goals achievable.
 

“Never look down to test the ground before taking your next step; only he who keeps his eye fixed on the far horizon will find the right road.”

Dag Hammarskjold

 
 

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Words Of Motivation: Money And Quality Of Life

 
 

Pretty Girl Hiding Behind A Fan Of Money

 
One of the most modern challenges in finding the purpose of your life is to find what really drives you. I think many of us would put earning a large amount of money top of our list of goals and, as I wrote recently, money is a great way to measure success.

Indeed, in another article, I promoted the idea that money can help provide inspiration messages to help us find the life we want. But recent events have shown that we need to strike a balance.

Money is a great way to measure success, let’s get that straight. If you want to move on and want to find the words of motivation to do so, then money is a great gauge. However, money in itself is not to final answer. It is what money gets you that is important.

Particularly in the western world, we need money to survive. Sadly, if you want time with your family, you need to find a way of earning money that will release the time for you to do so. Modern life means we need to pay the bills and few things come really free – but those that are free will be the things that make us happy. We just need to sort out the finances to allow us to enjoy them.

Money is only a means to an end and is only a way to help us get what is important in life.

The problem we now face, particularly in the United Kingdom, is that we are forgetting what really makes us happy and are making a god of money. This is particularly true in the way our government and institutions are run. Once again, even at this level, money should only be a measure of progress and not the final goal.

In 2011 there were 835 million smartphone users in the world and statistics for last year show 36 million smartphones in the UK alone. Figures from Portio Research expect the figure for the UK will increase to 63 million users by 2016. According to the mental health charity, MIND, around 25% of the UK population suffer mental health issues and depression is suffered by one in ten.

What does that mean? To me it means that, although we can buy the latest technology, it does not make us happy.

One of the treatments for depression is to get out among and help other people. Sadly modern life virtually discourages this. Few know their neighbours and spend much of their time working to earn the money to support their lifestyle, which often includes buying items, such as smart phones, in response to the material values projected by the media and government.

Are our goals really our own and do they really aim for our happiness? Do our words of motivation really get us the lifestyle we want?

In December last year, UK Prime Minister David Cameron defended his country’s membership of the European Union by stating that if Britain left the EU it would risk being like Norway. Norway is only a member of the European Economic Area and is considered unable to influence European financial policy. However, in an ironic twist, in 2011, it was Norway that was voted the happiest country in the world in the United Nations Human Development Index. Perhaps we do want to be like Norway.

In a 2008 poll, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation discovered that Britain has lost its moral compass with selfishness and greed leading to “social evils” such as family breakdown. “People are concerned about the way our society has become more individualistic, greedy and selfish, seemingly at a cost to our community,” the report states.

One participant quoted said, “Everything seems to be based around money and owning things. The more you have, the more successful you are. There’s nothing wrong with having enough, but there’s pressure on people to go for more and more.”
 

Positive Advertising Hoarding On Construction Site

 
One of the most important rules of setting goals is to never get what you want until you achieve your monetary goal. A key inspiration message from setting goals is the idea of delayed gratification. You learn discipline from setting a goal in terms of money and then working towards it (morally and ethically, of course), only buying items with the money when you have it.

One of the biggest problems in society is the pressure to have what you want now – using credit to get it if necessary. Statistics show that (in 2012) personal debit totaled an amazing £1,456 trillion: £55,988 per household. The average amount earned by a household in a year stands at £29,634. This means we pay a total of £63.2 billion of interest a year – £2,432 per household.

Many households need words of motivation as often one adult earns money purely to pay the mortgage and the other earns to pay the other bills and pay for essentials such as food and clothing.

This all comes about as we want to live beyond our means as a result of being bombarded by advertisements and media campaigns created by companies which are simply after our money. And we pay with money supplied by other people.

For me, this attitude of worshipping money was summed up in the recent National Health Service report that revealed that patients in a few hospitals were being treated appallingly and that there were around 3000 deaths related to poor care. The reason? The managers of the affected hospitals were more interested in achieving budgets than providing patient care. A report into 1200 deaths at the Mid Staffordshire hospital concluded that managers “put corporate self-interest and cost control ahead of patients and their safety.”

Success is as much about quality of life and, as much as money can help get you the things you want, we need to understand that money is only a tool to achieve goals that will create a lifestyle of which you can be proud. In the same way that doing the right thing by other people can help depression, success is only real if we feel we have helped others.

Money is important but it won’t get us to where we really want to be. Like everything else, money is our servant, not our master.

Words of motivation indeed.
 

“It is not the creation of wealth that is wrong, but the love of money for its own sake.”
Margaret Thatcher
 
 

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Words For Motivation: Sophie Christiansen Rides High

 
 

Sophie Christiansen At The Paralympic Victory Parade In London 2012

 
The London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games are now a memory but it would be a pity if we lost the inspiration messages the events of last summer gave us.

As we all know, there are many challenges to be faced in life and we all need words for motivation to overcome them. Many would find a major disability too much however. In November 1987, a baby daughter was born two month premature and was found to have cerebral palsy, jaundice, blood poisoning, and a collapsed lung. If that was not enough, the new baby then had a heart attack.

Despite all these challenges, the baby grew and her parents sent her to a normal school with a special unit attached where she was encouraged to enjoy sport, playing football and hockey at break times. Nonetheless she was shy and suffered some bullying. At the age of six, Sophie Christiansen began riding near her home in Berkshire and then with South Buckinghamshire branch of the charity Riding for the Disabled as a form of physiotherapy. She had at last found a sport she could compete in and was hooked.

In 2004, the 16 year old Sophie competed at the Paralympic Games in Athens and provided us all with inspiration messages by winning a bronze medal in the Grade 1 (severe disabilities) dressage behind fellow Britain Lee Pearson, who won the gold medal. Writing on the HorseHero.com website, Sophie explains how things changed: “I learnt the importance of teamwork, became more confident and less self-conscious due to the amount of interviews I had to do, and generally grew up. Athens did more than years of speech therapy for my confidence in communication. ”

Sophie continued by winning three gold medals in the 2005 World Championships in Hungary and a gold and a bronze in the 2007 World Championships.

The 2008 Paralympic Games were held in Beijing of course but the equestrian events took place in Hong Kong where Sophie won a gold medal in the individual freestyle dressage event and silver in the championship dressage. As if this was not enough, she then won gold in the team event.

In recognition of the words of motivation she gives to other people, Sophie Christiansen was named the BBC London Disabled Athlete of the Year in 2004 and was given an MBE in 2009 in addition to other awards.

The medals continued to come throughout 2009 and 2010 before she faced her home crowd at the London 2012 Paralympics. What great inspiration messages she gave us there. Sophie won three gold medals in the Individual, Freestyle and Team events, racking up a personal and Paralympic record score in the Freestyle event and winning the hearts of millions.

At no stage does Sophie allow her disability to get in her way. At times she has competed in wheelchair half marathons, winning the Windsor event in 2002. She refuses to be wheelchair bound but does use an electric scooter to travel longer distances. Away from sport, Sophie gained a Masters degree in Mathematics from Royal Holloway University early last year and worked part-time as a statistician.

In the 2013 New Years honours list, Sophie Christiansen was awarded an OBE and is coming to terms with her newfound status as a celebrity. Her career away from sport is on hold while she adapts to her new life: “Having had the success I’m determined to live with it.”

Sophie ensures she puts something back too: she has already been giving talks and words of motivation to schools, campaigns to have those with disabilities accepted and is supporting charities such as BLISS, who work for babies needing extra care.

Sophie Christiansen has a bubbly sense of humour but is also careful that her experiences send out words of motivation to others. “I hope the Paralympics will educate people in disability and also inspire them to go out and achieve their dream, no matter how difficult it is.”
 


 
 

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Daily Motivational Phrases: Number 512

 
 

“Remember, we all have something special to offer.
Most of us want to be honoured
and contribute something to the world;
we want to make a difference.
You need to honour others and
encourage them to contribute to the world as well.”

 

Jay Rifenbary (No Excuse! I’m Doing It)

 

Coach Encouraging A Boys Soccer Team Whilst Kneeling

 
 

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Daily Motivating Phrases: Number 511

 
 

“In everyone’s life, at some time,
our inner fire goes out.
It is then burst into flame by an encounter
with another human being.
We should all be thankful
for those people who rekindle the inner spirit.”

 

Albert Schweitzer

 

Two Smartly Dressed People Talking On Garden Benches

 

 

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