Inspirational Messages For LIfe

Hypeless Messages To Show Life Is Not Hopeless

Archive for the ‘Articles Containing Inspiration Messages’ Category

Molly Burke Provides Inspiration Messages

 
 

Schoolgirl in Grey Pullover Looking To One Side

 

School bullies have been responsible for breaking quite a few of their victims but some who have been bullied have turned their tormentors words into words of motivation.

Molly Burke of Ontario, Canada was four years old when she was diagnosed with retinitis pigments, which lead to a total loss of vision in a matter of years. Eventually she had to use a white stick and then was assigned a guide dog. In the meantime the bullying began and one child even suggested Molly kill herself. She did consider ending her own life, suffered depression and started to cut herself.

One day she fell and broke her ankle. She had to use crutches to get around and so was unable to take the dog with her. Other school girls lead her to a nearby forest, took away and smashed her crutches and ran away laughing.

Molly changed schools but the bullying continued. Eventually she found the courage to talk to the principal, who alerted her family. It was then that the young schoolgirl discovered there were people in her life who loved her enough to support her and provide words of motivation for her.

This inspirational young woman is now 18 years old and is one of Canada’s most popular public speakers. She talks on behalf of the Me to We company, which provides ethical products, experiences and speakers. Molly spreads words of motivation around schools across Canada, particularly to combat the bullying too many children experience.

Many of us could learn so much from such an inspirational young woman. As she says on the Me to We website: “If I can get up every single day motivated and able to inspire just one person, then everything I’ve been through is worth it.”

Find out more about Molly on the CTVNews website.
 
 

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Short Inspiring Stories: The Struggle of Orlando Bloom

 
 

Orlando Bloom In Black Tie And White Shirt

 
How many of us have a dream, only to give up when things get a little tough? One person who had such a dream, faced many obstacles on the way and yet still found inspiration messages enough to press on and achieve that dream was the actor Orlando Bloom.

Born on 13 January 1977, in Canterbury, Kent, Bloom was named after the 16th century composer Orlando Gibbons. He had one elder sister, Samantha, and was the son of Sonia and Harry Bloom. His mother had been born in India and Harry was a South African born Jewish anti-apartheid novelist.

When Orlando was four, his father died of a stroke and nine years later it was revealed to him that his real biological father was a family friend, Colin Stone, who became Orlando’s guardian.

Orlando Bloom is dyslexic but, with words of motivation from his family, he managed to get through school in Canterbury. A key turning point for the young man was when he realised that the characters he had watched in films or on television were simply actors playing a part. Suddenly he wanted to play his heroes and his dream to be an actor began. Initially he was active in school plays and the local theatre company and became interested in poetry and prose.

Pursuing his ambitions, the young Orlando moved to London in 1993 and began to work with small parts in such television dramas as ‘Casualty’ and ‘Midsomer Murders.’ Initially studying at the Fine Arts College, Hampstead, he spent two years at the National Youth Theatre, before receiving a scholarship with the British American Drama Academy.

In 1997, Orlando played a small part as a rent boy in the acclaimed movie, ‘Wilde,’ which starred Stephen Fry. Although he was then offered various other film roles, he decided to do more theatre and eventually began a new course of study at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

In 1998, Orlando was visiting a friend when he climbed onto a gutter to fix a jammed balcony door. He lost his footing and plunged three stories to the ground. Rushed to hospital, he underwent six hours of surgery that left him with plates and bolts in his back. His doctor broke to him the news that Orlando may never walk again.

But Orlando Bloom’s dream was stronger than that. He provided his own words of motivation, deciding that he would make himself walk again and would never let fear restrict his life.

Two weeks after being admitted into hospital, he haltingly walked out again. He resumed his studies and began acting on stage in such plays as ‘Twelfth Night.’ One night in 1999, the audience for one of the plays included movie director Peter Jackson, who approached Orlando after the show and asked him to audition for a film he was casting.

A few weeks later, the young actor graduated from college and went straight out to New Zealand, where he spent 18 months playing the physically demanding part of Legolas in the massively successful ‘Lord of the Rings’ trilogy.

Orlando Bloom is now one of the most sought-after actors with parts in several major movies such as ‘Black Hawk Down’ and ‘Pirates of the Caribbean.’ In 2005 he was finally cast in a leading role in the medieval epic ‘Kingdom of Heaven’ when he played alongside such greats as Jeremy Irons and Liam Neeson.

He is never too busy however to return to his roots in theatre. In 2007 he appeared in ‘Celebration,’ a play by David Storey, and is always happy to try new plays and films that are a bit different or low budget.

In 2010, Orlando Bloom married Miranda Kerr and, early in 2011, a son, Flynn Bloom, was born to the couple in Los Angeles.

Orlando lives most of his time in London however and regularly makes time to be with his family and friends away from acting. Despite his earlier experiences, he admits to being an adrenaline junkie; he regularly took part in bungee jumping, skiing, surfing, Rugby Union and skateboarding. He is a practising Buddhist and in 2009 was named a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, visiting schools in Nepal to support education and sanitation programmes.

Although one assumes fatherhood has toned his adventurous spirit, Orlando still has an insatiable zest for life, despite having broken his back, an arm, both legs, a wrist, a finger, a toe and his nose in various accidents. His philosophy provides words of motivation for all of us but Orlando Bloom is still phlegmatic about life: “People come into your life and people leave it… you just have to trust that life has a road mapped out for you.”

 

“I know you can be up one minute and drop the next, so I’m trying to maintain a steady course so I can have some longevity.”
 

Orlando Bloom
 
 

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Margaret Thatcher: A Source of Many Words of Motivation

 
 

Margaret Thatcher In Salisbury July 2005

 

“If you just set out to be liked, you would be prepared to compromise on anything at any time, and you would achieve nothing.”
 

Margaret Thatcher
 

Margaret Hilda Roberts was born on 13 October 1925 and died on 8 April 2013. Sadly some of her political opponents have made an attempt to disguise the extraordinary life of this tough woman, named ‘the Iron Lady’ by a Russian journalist, but her achievements will still be remembered by history.

She was born to Alf and Beatrice Roberts in a flat above one of his two grocery shops in Grantham, Lincolnshire. Alf was a Methodist preacher and an Independent alderman on the local council. Eventually he became the town Mayor.

Margaret went to the local school and received a scholarship to Kesteven and Grantham Girls School. She applied for a scholarship to study chemistry at Oxford but was rejected. Fortunately another student withdrew and Margaret studied for, and received, her degree. Her political career began at university, with the young Margaret becoming President of the Oxford University Conservative Association.

She began work as a research chemist and was selected as the Conservative candidate for Dartford in Kent. At the dinner after her selection she met the man she was to marry – Denis Thatcher. They married in December 1951 after Margaret had been beaten in two general elections.

This determined lady then studied Law and qualified as a Barrister in the same year as she gave birth to twins, Carol and Mark.

Once again she was defeated in another election before being elected Member of Parliament for Finchley in 1958. She rapidly made her mark in the Conservative party, working in the Ministry of Pensions before becoming the party’s spokesperson on Housing and Land. Other roles followed before she became Minister for Education in 1970. Throughout her career, Margaret was involved in economic and international discussions, attending lunches at the Institute of Economic Affairs.

In 1974, Margaret Thatcher succeeded Edward Heath as leader of the Conservative party. In 1979, after a loss of confidence in the Labour government, she became Britain’s first woman Prime Minister.

During her time in office, Mrs. Thatcher’s determination and strength were obvious to all. In many ways, she was the last Prime Minister with charisma and a belief in her policies. Her strength was particularly reflected in her determination to disrupt the power of the unions, who many felt had been at least partly responsible for the country’s economic woes in the 1970s, in her attitude to the terrorists in Northern Ireland and the Argentinian invasion of the Falkland Islands in 1982.

In 1984, Mrs. Thatcher narrowly escaped a bomb attack by the IRA in the Grand Hotel, Brighton. Five others were killed. It was characteristic of the woman that when the attack took place, at 3am, she was still in her study working. She was due to give a speech to the Conservative Party Conference next day and duly gave it as planned.

Throughout her premiership, Mrs. Thatcher was instrumental in foreign affairs, including the break-up of the USSR.

After a remarkable 11-year period in office, during which she achieved many of her aims and made many friends and enemies, Margaret Thatcher faced one too many leadership challenges and had to resign.

Her strong personality has resulted in many anecdotes. Lech Walesa, former President of Poland, remembers some advice Mrs. Thatcher gave him: “Write down the 10 steps from where you are now to where you want to be.” But she also had a human side too; Left-wing politician Tony Benn recalled seeing her at the funeral of Labour MP Eric Heffer, “I thanked her for coming and she burst into tears. She had come out of respect for someone whose opinions she disagreed with.”

If you want to know more about this charismatic politician, visit the Margaret Thatcher Foundation website.

 

“Disciplining yourself to do what you know is right and important, although difficult, is the highroad to pride, self-esteem, and personal satisfaction.”
 

Margaret Thatcher
 
 

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Words Of Motivation: Money And Quality Of Life

 
 

Pretty Girl Hiding Behind A Fan Of Money

 
One of the most modern challenges in finding the purpose of your life is to find what really drives you. I think many of us would put earning a large amount of money top of our list of goals and, as I wrote recently, money is a great way to measure success.

Indeed, in another article, I promoted the idea that money can help provide inspiration messages to help us find the life we want. But recent events have shown that we need to strike a balance.

Money is a great way to measure success, let’s get that straight. If you want to move on and want to find the words of motivation to do so, then money is a great gauge. However, money in itself is not to final answer. It is what money gets you that is important.

Particularly in the western world, we need money to survive. Sadly, if you want time with your family, you need to find a way of earning money that will release the time for you to do so. Modern life means we need to pay the bills and few things come really free – but those that are free will be the things that make us happy. We just need to sort out the finances to allow us to enjoy them.

Money is only a means to an end and is only a way to help us get what is important in life.

The problem we now face, particularly in the United Kingdom, is that we are forgetting what really makes us happy and are making a god of money. This is particularly true in the way our government and institutions are run. Once again, even at this level, money should only be a measure of progress and not the final goal.

In 2011 there were 835 million smartphone users in the world and statistics for last year show 36 million smartphones in the UK alone. Figures from Portio Research expect the figure for the UK will increase to 63 million users by 2016. According to the mental health charity, MIND, around 25% of the UK population suffer mental health issues and depression is suffered by one in ten.

What does that mean? To me it means that, although we can buy the latest technology, it does not make us happy.

One of the treatments for depression is to get out among and help other people. Sadly modern life virtually discourages this. Few know their neighbours and spend much of their time working to earn the money to support their lifestyle, which often includes buying items, such as smart phones, in response to the material values projected by the media and government.

Are our goals really our own and do they really aim for our happiness? Do our words of motivation really get us the lifestyle we want?

In December last year, UK Prime Minister David Cameron defended his country’s membership of the European Union by stating that if Britain left the EU it would risk being like Norway. Norway is only a member of the European Economic Area and is considered unable to influence European financial policy. However, in an ironic twist, in 2011, it was Norway that was voted the happiest country in the world in the United Nations Human Development Index. Perhaps we do want to be like Norway.

In a 2008 poll, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation discovered that Britain has lost its moral compass with selfishness and greed leading to “social evils” such as family breakdown. “People are concerned about the way our society has become more individualistic, greedy and selfish, seemingly at a cost to our community,” the report states.

One participant quoted said, “Everything seems to be based around money and owning things. The more you have, the more successful you are. There’s nothing wrong with having enough, but there’s pressure on people to go for more and more.”
 

Positive Advertising Hoarding On Construction Site

 
One of the most important rules of setting goals is to never get what you want until you achieve your monetary goal. A key inspiration message from setting goals is the idea of delayed gratification. You learn discipline from setting a goal in terms of money and then working towards it (morally and ethically, of course), only buying items with the money when you have it.

One of the biggest problems in society is the pressure to have what you want now – using credit to get it if necessary. Statistics show that (in 2012) personal debit totaled an amazing £1,456 trillion: £55,988 per household. The average amount earned by a household in a year stands at £29,634. This means we pay a total of £63.2 billion of interest a year – £2,432 per household.

Many households need words of motivation as often one adult earns money purely to pay the mortgage and the other earns to pay the other bills and pay for essentials such as food and clothing.

This all comes about as we want to live beyond our means as a result of being bombarded by advertisements and media campaigns created by companies which are simply after our money. And we pay with money supplied by other people.

For me, this attitude of worshipping money was summed up in the recent National Health Service report that revealed that patients in a few hospitals were being treated appallingly and that there were around 3000 deaths related to poor care. The reason? The managers of the affected hospitals were more interested in achieving budgets than providing patient care. A report into 1200 deaths at the Mid Staffordshire hospital concluded that managers “put corporate self-interest and cost control ahead of patients and their safety.”

Success is as much about quality of life and, as much as money can help get you the things you want, we need to understand that money is only a tool to achieve goals that will create a lifestyle of which you can be proud. In the same way that doing the right thing by other people can help depression, success is only real if we feel we have helped others.

Money is important but it won’t get us to where we really want to be. Like everything else, money is our servant, not our master.

Words of motivation indeed.
 

“It is not the creation of wealth that is wrong, but the love of money for its own sake.”
Margaret Thatcher
 
 

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Words For Motivation: Sophie Christiansen Rides High

 
 

Sophie Christiansen At The Paralympic Victory Parade In London 2012

 
The London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games are now a memory but it would be a pity if we lost the inspiration messages the events of last summer gave us.

As we all know, there are many challenges to be faced in life and we all need words for motivation to overcome them. Many would find a major disability too much however. In November 1987, a baby daughter was born two month premature and was found to have cerebral palsy, jaundice, blood poisoning, and a collapsed lung. If that was not enough, the new baby then had a heart attack.

Despite all these challenges, the baby grew and her parents sent her to a normal school with a special unit attached where she was encouraged to enjoy sport, playing football and hockey at break times. Nonetheless she was shy and suffered some bullying. At the age of six, Sophie Christiansen began riding near her home in Berkshire and then with South Buckinghamshire branch of the charity Riding for the Disabled as a form of physiotherapy. She had at last found a sport she could compete in and was hooked.

In 2004, the 16 year old Sophie competed at the Paralympic Games in Athens and provided us all with inspiration messages by winning a bronze medal in the Grade 1 (severe disabilities) dressage behind fellow Britain Lee Pearson, who won the gold medal. Writing on the HorseHero.com website, Sophie explains how things changed: “I learnt the importance of teamwork, became more confident and less self-conscious due to the amount of interviews I had to do, and generally grew up. Athens did more than years of speech therapy for my confidence in communication. ”

Sophie continued by winning three gold medals in the 2005 World Championships in Hungary and a gold and a bronze in the 2007 World Championships.

The 2008 Paralympic Games were held in Beijing of course but the equestrian events took place in Hong Kong where Sophie won a gold medal in the individual freestyle dressage event and silver in the championship dressage. As if this was not enough, she then won gold in the team event.

In recognition of the words of motivation she gives to other people, Sophie Christiansen was named the BBC London Disabled Athlete of the Year in 2004 and was given an MBE in 2009 in addition to other awards.

The medals continued to come throughout 2009 and 2010 before she faced her home crowd at the London 2012 Paralympics. What great inspiration messages she gave us there. Sophie won three gold medals in the Individual, Freestyle and Team events, racking up a personal and Paralympic record score in the Freestyle event and winning the hearts of millions.

At no stage does Sophie allow her disability to get in her way. At times she has competed in wheelchair half marathons, winning the Windsor event in 2002. She refuses to be wheelchair bound but does use an electric scooter to travel longer distances. Away from sport, Sophie gained a Masters degree in Mathematics from Royal Holloway University early last year and worked part-time as a statistician.

In the 2013 New Years honours list, Sophie Christiansen was awarded an OBE and is coming to terms with her newfound status as a celebrity. Her career away from sport is on hold while she adapts to her new life: “Having had the success I’m determined to live with it.”

Sophie ensures she puts something back too: she has already been giving talks and words of motivation to schools, campaigns to have those with disabilities accepted and is supporting charities such as BLISS, who work for babies needing extra care.

Sophie Christiansen has a bubbly sense of humour but is also careful that her experiences send out words of motivation to others. “I hope the Paralympics will educate people in disability and also inspire them to go out and achieve their dream, no matter how difficult it is.”
 


 
 

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Inspiration Messages From Hannah Cockroft

 
 

Hannah Cockroft Winning A Heat At The 2012 London Paralympic Games

 
In the 2012 New Years honours list many Olympians, Paralympians and other people who have provided inspiration messages for us during the year received well-deserved recognition. For me, one of the most deserved awards was an MBE for the wheelchair athlete Hannah Cockroft.

Born on 30 July 1992 in Halifax, Hannah suffered two cardiac arrests as she was born and these damaged her brain so that she had impaired balance and mobility, weak hips, and deformed feet and legs. Doctors believed Hannah would never be able to walk, talk or live beyond adolescence. It was expected she would never be able to look after herself.

Hannah told reporters “I don’t like people telling me what to do. My parents put me in standing frames I hated them for it at the time but now I cannot thank them enough.”

With the support of her parents, Hannah did not let her challenges stop her and in school she became interested in sport, competing in swimming, seated discus, wheelchair rugby, wheelchair basketball and wheelchair racing. Her bubbly personality meant she found the inspiration messages to enjoy her sport. Her father was a welder and built a racing wheelchair for her.

In 2007, Hannah went to a British Paralympic Association open day at Loughborough University where she met Dr. Ian Thompson who was married to the wheelchair-racing champion Tanni Grey-Thompson. Hannah says, “Ian let me have a go in his wheelchair and I loved it. I’d never experienced anything like it before. You go and you don’t stop.” Dr. Thompson agreed to coach Hannah for the first year, providing the words of motivation she needed to get her career started.

Hannah received a new wheelchair from the WhizzKids charity, which helped her mobility and the following year a dance academy she attended gave her the money to buy her own racing wheelchair. This was the famous chair she named ‘Sally’ and she used to gain great success in subsequent years.

Hannah was invited to join the British Paralympic team.

At the 2010 British Wheelchair Athletics Association International championships she broke four world records. Initially she was aiming for success at the 2016 Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro but her new coach Peter Eriksson provided the words of motivation she needed to aim for London 2012.

Hannah continued to break records leading up the London Games and, once the events started, she won the first track and field gold medal for Great Britain winning the T4 100 metres in a new Paralympic record time. A week later she won her second gold in the T34 200 metres – again in a record time.

Voted by FHM magazine as ‘the sexiest Paralympic athlete’, Hannah has managed to retain her down-to-earth bubbly personality and is now training for future races. “There is always something to aim for, you’ve just got to find it and concentrate on it.”

In the meantime Hannah finds time to provide inspiration messages for other people, using her newfound fame to help others achieve in the way she has.

“You meet some people who’ve had accidents and they’re like ‘my life is so terrible, I’m disabled, feel sorry for me’, and then you meet others who say their life is so much better now and that’s just amazing to hear. I’ve been disabled since birth and I’ve always been a bit cocky, but it’s really inspirational to meet people who don’t think that life stops when you get put in a wheelchair.”

“Miss Hannah Lucy Cockroft MBE has a certain ring to it don’t you think?” She says on Facebook.

The video below gives a great impression of the personality of this strong but endearing athlete.
 


 
 

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Inspiration Message: The Effects Of The London Olympic Games

 
 

The summer of 2012 has provided many inspiration messages and will surely go down as one of the most exciting times in recent history – but only if we learn the lessons available.

In June Queen Elizabeth celebrated her Diamond Jubilee. Following the phenomenal success of the wedding of her grandson, William, to the glamorous Catherine Middleton, the events surrounding the Jubilee started to engender an enthusiasm and pride in the British people that has been rarely seen for some time.

With foreign nationals swelling the celebrating crowds to over 500,000 and a home television audience peaking at 17 million, it seems the feel good factor was felt all over the country and beyond its shores.

Prior to the events in June, the British people had little confidence and many believed the forthcoming Olympic Games would not succeed. Those watching the slick organisation and technology of the Jubilee celebrations however began to think ‘maybe we can do it.’

So 27 July arrived and with it the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games. The show was refreshingly well staged and impressed many who had doubted Britain could match the spectacular events surrounding the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

And yet we had all misjudged the stunning inspiration messages we were to receive over the next seventeen days of the Olympic Games. Ninety percent of the British population watched the Games and an estimated 4 billion worldwide watched as the drama unfolded.

Every day new inspiration messages were witnessed. Laura Trott was born with a collapsed lung and asthma and was told to take up sport to regulate her breathing. Laura won two Gold medals in track cycling. Joanna Rowsell also won Gold in the cycling velodrome and removed her helmet to show she has no hair. Joanna suffers from alopecia and happily champions on behalf of others with the same condition. She shows that wearing a wig can be glamorous.

On the last day of competition, Modern Pentathlon Silver medal winner, Samantha Murray, was being interviewed when she turned to the camera and said “If you have a goal, anything you want to achieve in life, don’t let anyone get in your way because you can do it.” Words of motivation indeed.

But if we thought the Olympic Games had given us inspiration messages, nobody had considered the effect the following Paralympic games would have.

The Paralympians, who took our collective breath away between 29 August and 9 September, provided hourly examples of inspiration messages that took away all our excuses. The two personalities beloved by the media before the Games, Ellie Simmonds, already the winner of two swimming Gold medals in Beijing (at the age of 13) and Oscar Pistorius, who has dominated Paralympic running for several years, went ahead and won more medals. Ellie is a big personality in a diminutive form and has achondroplesia dwarfism whilst Oscar had his legs removed below the knee when a baby and runs on blades.

Sophie Christiansen was born with severe cerebral palsy and fought to live. At the age of six she found an affinity with horses. Her talent was recognised and she won two Gold medals in Beijing. Like Ellie Simmonds, Sophie was awarded the MBE by the Queen and earned a Masters degree in mathematics. During the London Paralympic Games she won three more Gold medals: another great inspiration message.

Harriet Lee suffers from Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, a condition involving enlarged organs and an increased risk of cancer, and four months ago she was rushed into intensive care. Fortunately she was released in time for the Paralympic Games but then fell ill on the first day of competition. Despite all this, Lee engaged in a duel with Russian swimmer Nina Ryabova in the 100 metres breaststroke and won the bronze medal. “It’s been a hard slog to get here and to finish off the year with a medal is quite emotional,” she told reporters afterwards.

But inspiration messages were not only found among the athletes. Seventy thousand volunteers were on hand to ensure both sets of Games went smoothly and that athletes and spectators enjoyed the experience.

These ‘Games Makers’ received particular praise from many people for their cheerful hard work but none were more deserving of plaudits than Liam Conlen from Essex, whose job it was to meet two cyclists from the small African country of Burkina Faso. Sadly the arrangements for the two athletes went wrong and they had no support and nowhere to go. Seeing the problem, Liam simply took the three men in the party home with him to his parents’ house while two women were housed in a nearby convent.

The local community also gathered round to help; the local school offered training facilities to the group and a local company helped upgrade their bicycles to competition specification. The two Burkina Faso cyclists did not win any medals but the town of Abridge in Essex won a lot more.

The British athletes, known as ‘TeamGB,’ won more medals than ever before and the hearts of a nation. And yet the lessons and inspiration messages of London 2012 are relevant to everyone, no matter in what country they are or their physical condition.

I was lucky enough to visit the Olympic Park during the Paralympic games and can tell you that the atmosphere was completely positive, enjoyable and full of inspiration messages. But the attitude did not stop there, an aura of confidence and positivity has covered the country. Sadly the politicians and media have been slow to realize this but for the first time in history this does not matter.

The Internet now means that people can express their views to each other without interference. As with the so-called Arab Spring, we can all take control and say ‘We want to be proud of our country and be part of the world community too.’ We have seen inspiration messages and examples of great courage and strength and realize there are no longer any excuses. We no longer have to take the lead from politicians or the press but can dictate what we want our world to look like.

Every one of us has seen that we can take control of our own lives and through words of motivation become the best we can be. Just as the events in London were lit by a flame, it is up to us to carry the torch, the spirit of what we have seen, forward to benefit everyone in Britain and everyone around the world.

 

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Inspiration Message: The Paradox Of Success

We all want to lead more fulfilling, interesting and meaningful lives. What this really means is different for every one of us and yet there are inspiration messages that apply to all of us.

I believe that success is not success without treating other people correctly. This may not come as surprise as I have said this elsewhere on this site but my next words of motivation might: you need to be selfish too.

‘Hold on,’ you say, ‘how can you say you need to do right by other people AND say you need to be selfish?’ This is the paradox of success.

I regularly come across people who believe the inspiration message ‘You have to look after number one’ or ‘Look after yourself and forget the others’ but those people have rarely achieved anything or, if they have, it is hollow success (which I would hardly consider success at all). I tend to see this as the ‘Losers Creed’ and yet there is a grain of truth in it.

The reality is there is a time to be selfish and a time to look out for others. The key is to know when those times are. A popular example is the use of oxygen masks on an airplane. Listen to the instructions you are given before undertaking a flight. They invariably tell you to, in an emergency, put on your own mask before helping the person next to you to do so. And this is my inspiration message too: you cannot help somebody else if you are in a weak position too.

The time to be selfish is when you are identifying your dreams and understanding what you need to do to put yourself in a strong position. I once researched the idea of making a career in counselling. As part of this, I visited a gentleman who was a guru in this field, having just retired from a senior position at Cambridge University. One of the inspiration messages I remember him telling me was that all counsellors need to take time out to be counselled themselves in order to serve their clients effectively.

Here are some more words of motivation: we need to make the best of ourselves in order to be able to give to other people. The most basic version of this is we need money to give money to the poor but it goes beyond that. We also need to be strong in order to emotionally support others.

Of course we cannot expect to help everyone in the world but we can certainly help those with which we have contact. Obviously these include our own family and friends but I would also argue it involves strangers with whom we come into contact, no matter how briefly. Just a cheery greeting can change someone’s day.

There is a second paradox here too. If you take the time to pass on some positive words of motivation to another person, you will find it produces a warm feeling of contentment inside you too. Try it and you will understand. It is a widespread belief too that helping others will attract even more success to you.

The author James Allen wrote these words of motivation, “Let your soul expand, let your heart reach out to others in loving and generous warmth, and great and lasting will be your joy, and all prosperity will come to you.”

The truth is, as John Donne wrote, no man is an island and we need to ensure our contact with others is positive every time.

So a good inspiration message is we need to make the best of ourselves as often as we need in order to serve those who need us to be strong. Then when we do deal with other people we need to ensure as many as possible benefit from the experience. It can be a difficult balance but getting it right means success will be all the sweeter.

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Words For Motivation: The Olympic Poem

 
 

Any celebration of the Olympic Games provides inspiration messages for those keen to find them and the 2012 London Olympic Games were no exception.

There were many, many stories of overcoming the odds to achieve great things – and the inspiration messages were not reserved only for the winners of gold medals. There were great stories to be found among the other medal winners and also those who did not get a medal and yet gained so much. Their stories will be told over the coming weeks and months.

But the London Olympic Games involved contribution from more than just the athletes and the charismatic Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, commissioned a competition among local school children to write a poem that summed up the words of motivation the Games represented.

The winning verses of encouragement were written by 15-year-old Fope Jegede and were put to music by the BBC and shown during their coverage of the closing ceremony.

The resulting video is shown below.

 

THE CHAMPIONS STORY
 
She was a little girl with a dream
Watching champions on the TV screen…
The race of their lives, they’d run
The gold medal desired to be won
You Olympians with your glory and might
Did you know you inspired a girl tonight?
She was then a teenager with a dream
Aspiring to be a champion on that TV screen…
Ambition engraved in her heart
From the running tracks she’d never depart
Growing in speed, strength, determination
Until the day she’d represent her nation
You judges who chose her, this day you’ll never rue
Did you know you’ve just made her dreams come true?
She is now a woman who’s living her dream
She’s the champion on the TV screen…
Head high, face glowing in pride
This moment will never leave her side
The honour, respect, and glory
Never thought she’d tell such a story
You in the crowd, amazed at her win
Today is the day your story begins.

By Fope Jegede, aged 15

This video and its words of motivation can also be seen on the BBC website.

 
 

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Inspiration Message: Tough People Last

 

Open the newspapers any day and you are unlikely to find much in the way of inspiration messages. In reality this is accurate reporting even though the press seem to revel in the troubled times in which we find ourselves.

The bizarre situation means that the position may be even worse than is first reported. In the United Kingdom the nation’s debt has hit £1.038 trillion and this represents 66.1% of the country’s gross domestic product (Source: Office Of National Statistics). If you include the debts of the banking industry the total increase to a massive £2.3 trillion. The compounding of interest payments means this situation is likely to get worse in the short term at least.

This is a dangerous situation for the UK but it has to be remembered that other countries are in a similar situation or even worse. Japan has a 194% National Debt and other European countries are as bad. The Euro currency countries are struggling and could drag other world economies into deeper recession. The economy of Greece in particular is set to contract by 7% over the next twelve months.

There is little in the way of inspiration messages to be had from the economy so how are individuals and families coping? Sadly the situation is probably worse and there appear to be few words of motivation here either. Personal debt in the UK currently stands at £1.46 trillion. The CreditAction.org.uk website calculates this means an average debt of £55,514 per household (including mortgages) and this represents 122% of average earnings. The level of personal debt is set to reach £2 trillion by 2017.

Set this against a reduction in average income by 3.5% over the last year, a worrying level of redundancies and lay-offs, an increase in spending by young people and the fact that interest levels are at an all-time low so they can only go up and you have a powder keg waiting to explode. My personal experience is that in many families the husband works to pay the mortgage and the wife works to pay the bills.

Okay, so money is not everything but there is a lack of inspiration messages elsewhere too. Environmental issues are being ignored. An over dependence on public bodies and unreliable statistics mean we are falling into the trap of believing climate change is the only challenge. An example in the UK exists in the overdevelopment of our land. Drainage is becoming a problem as too much land is being concreted over and planning policies are based on spurious mathematical projections.

Take the small town of Romsey in Hampshire. A pretty market town with a population of less than 20,000, Romsey is threatened by the proposed addition of another 4,000 new houses. The development is based entirely on a national estimate of population increase over the next few years: an estimate with little basis in the real world (according to bodies such as the Campaign To Protect Rural England). Also proposed is the building of a new Tesco store on a green field outside the town, a move that will threaten existing town centre shops and the character of the town itself. Why do Tesco think it is worth building there? It is down to the projected population increase.

Regrettably politicians are inactive in solving the problems as they are influenced by large businesses (including the banks and developers) and they get involved in political arguments but do nothing to provide inspiration messages.

But this is a site providing inspiration messages. Where are the words of motivation in the above depressing evidence? The truth is, we face troubled times but, as Robert H. Schuller put it, tough times never last but tough people do.

We can see the problems coming. We can prepare to face the situation and come out better. Prepare now by immersing yourself in inspiration messages and you will be able to deal with anything that comes your way.

As I write, a few miles away from me sportsmen and women are fighting to reach their best performance in the Olympic Games. The serious problems we face in the world are simply our opportunity to become our best. Take the inspiration messages available to you, become the best person you can be and win your gold medal, whatever that represents to you.

Former Olympic champion, Sally Gunnell, gives us words of motivation in her wonderful book ‘Be Your Best:’ “I have every faith you can reach your personal best, whether it’s a gold medal or simply to enjoy living inside your skin. Whatever you want, you can do it.”

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